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The Load Capability of Piezoelectric Single Crystal Actuators

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011

Tian-Bing Xu
Affiliation:
t.xu@larc.nasa.gov, National Institute of Aerospace, 100 Exploration Way, Hampton, VA, 23666, United States
Ji Su
Affiliation:
j.su@larc.nasa.gov
Xiaoning Jiang
Affiliation:
t.xu@larc.nasa.gov
Paul W. Rehrig
Affiliation:
t.xu@larc.nasa.gov
Wesley S. Hackenberger
Affiliation:
t.xu@larc.nasa.gov
Corresponding
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Abstract

Piezoelectric lead magnesium niobate-lead titanate (PMN-PT) single crystal is one of the most promising materials for electromechanical device applications due to its high electrical field induced strain and high electromechanical coupling factor. PMN-PT single crystal-based multilayer stack actuators and multilayer stack-based flextensional actuators have exhibited high stroke and high displacement-voltage ratios. The actuation capabilities of these two actuators were evaluated using a newly developed method based upon a laser vibrometer system under various loading conditions. The measured displacements as a function of mechanical loads at different driving voltages indicate that the displacement response of the actuators is approximately constant under broad ranges of mechanical load. The load capabilities of these PMN-PT single crystal-based actuators and the advantages of the capability for applications will be discussed.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2006

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