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Laser Direct Writing of Hydrous Ruthenium Dioxide Micro-Pseudocapacitors

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 March 2011

Craig B. Arnold
Affiliation:
Materials Science and Technology Division, Code 6372
Ryan C. Wartena
Affiliation:
Chemistry Division, Code 6171 Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375, USA.
Bhanu Pratap
Affiliation:
Materials Science and Technology Division, Code 6372
Karen E. Swider-Lyons
Affiliation:
Chemistry Division, Code 6171 Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375, USA.
Alberto Piqué
Affiliation:
Materials Science and Technology Division, Code 6372
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Abstract

We are using a laser engineering approach to develop and optimize hydrous ruthenium dioxide (RuOxHy or RuO2·0.5 H2O) pseudocapacitors. We employ a novel laser forward transfer process, Matrix Assisted Pulsed Laser Evaporation Direct Write (MAPLE-DW), in combination with UV laser machining, to fabricate mesoscale pseudocapacitors and microbatteries under ambient temperature and atmospheric conditions. Thin films with the desired high surface area morphology are obtained without compromising their electrochemical performance. The highest capacitance structures are achieved by depositing mixtures of sulfuric acid with the RuO2·0.5 H2O electrode material. Our pseudocapacitors exhibit linear discharge behavior and their properties scale proportionately when assembled in parallel and series configurations.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2002

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