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Ion-Assisted Deposition of Silicon Epitaxial Films with High Deposition Rate Using Low Energy Silicon Ions

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  17 March 2011

Lars Oberbeck
Affiliation:
Institute of Physical Electronics, University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 47, 70569 Stuttgart, Germany
Thomas A. Wagner
Affiliation:
Institute of Physical Electronics, University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 47, 70569 Stuttgart, Germany
Ralf B. Bergmann
Affiliation:
Institute of Physical Electronics, University of Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 47, 70569 Stuttgart, Germany
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Abstract

Ion-assisted deposition (IAD) enables low temperature (≥ 435°C), high-rate (≤ 0.5 μm/min) epitaxial growth of silicon films. Therefore, IAD is an interesting deposition technique for microelectronic devices and thin film solar cells. The Hall-mobility of monocrystalline epitaxial layers increases with deposition temperature Tdep and reaches values comparable to those of bulk Si at Tdep ≥ 540°C. Polycrystalline epitaxial layers exhibit inhomogeneous electrical properties, as shown by Light Beam Induced Current measurements. Recombination within the grains dominates over recombination at grain boundaries. Secco etching identifies an inhomogeneous density of extended structural defects in the polycrystalline epitaxial layers and in the substrate. A major part of the extended defects in the epitaxial layers originates from defects in the substrate.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2000

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Ion-Assisted Deposition of Silicon Epitaxial Films with High Deposition Rate Using Low Energy Silicon Ions
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