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Ion Implantation Defect Characterization by High-Resolution X-Ray Diffraction

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 February 2011

Jos G.E. Klappe
Affiliation:
University of Twente, MESA Research Institute, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede, The Netherlands
István Bársony
Affiliation:
on leave from the Technical University of Budapest, Budapest, Hungary, University of Twente, MESA Research Institute, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede, The Netherlands
Tom W. Ryan
Affiliation:
Philips Analytical, Letyweg 1, 7602 EA Almelo, The Netherlands
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Abstract

High-energy ion-implantation is one of the roost critical processing steps regarding the formation of defects in mono-crystalline silicon. High- as well as low-doses implanted at various energies can result in relatively high residual defect concentrations after post-implantation annealing.

Before annealing, the crystal lattice strain is mainly caused by the point defects. After annealing, the accommodation of substitutional impurities is the main origin of the residual lattice strain. High-Resolution X-ray Diffraction (HRXD) has been frequently used for the characterization of these structures. Dislocation loops formed during the high temperature step, however, cause enhanced diffuse X-ray scattering, which can dominate the measured X-ray intensity in conventional HRXD.

Triple axis diffractometry is used in this study to analyze the size, type and location of defects in a boron implanted and rapid thermally annealed silicon sample.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1992

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References

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