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In-situ Studies of a Novel Sodium Flame Process for Synthesis of Fine Particles

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 February 2011

Kristen L. Steffens
Affiliation:
National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD20899, mrz@tiber.nist.gov
Michael R. Zachariah
Affiliation:
National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD20899, mrz@tiber.nist.gov
Douglas P. Dufaux
Affiliation:
Mechanical Engineering Department, Washington University, St. Louis, MO63130
Richard L. Axelbaum
Affiliation:
Mechanical Engineering Department, Washington University, St. Louis, MO63130
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Abstract

This study focuses on the optical characterization of a novel method of forming nanoscale titanium and boron particles, which can be used to form ceramic precursors such as TiB2. TiCl4 or BCl3 reacts with heated Na vapor in a counterflow diffusion flame reactor. After Na strips the Ti or B of its Cl atoms, nanosize Ti or B particles form and become encased in NaCl, which helps to prevent agglomeration and oxidation. The two-dimensional spatial distribution of the Na dimer has been optically interrogated using planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) to clarify the influence of the concentration distributions and transport on particle formation rates.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1996

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