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In-situ Microscopic Study of Cu Intragranular Electromigration

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 February 2011

Kuan-Chia Chen
Affiliation:
d927535@oz.nthu.edu.tw, materials science and engineering, NTHU, 101, Section 2 Kuang Fu Road, Hsinchu, Taiwan, 30013, Taiwan
Chien-Neng Liao
Affiliation:
cnliao@mse.nthu.edu.tw, Materials Science and Engineering, NTHU, Taiwan
Wen-Wei Wu
Affiliation:
wwwu@mse.nthu.edu.tw, Materials Science and Engineering, NTHU, Taiwan
Lih-Juann Chen
Affiliation:
ljchen@mse.nthu.edu.tw, Materials Science and Engineering, NTHU, Taiwan
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Abstract

Electromigration (EM) in unpassivated copper lines at room temperature has been investigated in ultra-high vacuum by in-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The electric current induced atomic migration in a (211)-oriented Cu grain has been successfully recorded in real-time video. The atomic image of the (211) grain was found to vanish directionally when applying an electric current density of 2 × 106 A/cm2 through the Cu line. The results suggested that the combination of {111} planes and <110> directions to be the easiest EM path in crystalline copper. By performing selective area diffraction (SAD) analysis on a single Cu grain with (111) crystal orientation, some unusual electron diffraction patterns appeared after passing an electric current through the Cu line. It is believed that the EM-induced Cu twinning may be held responsible for the unique diffraction patterns

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2006

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