Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-846f6c7c4f-s4lzp Total loading time: 0.23 Render date: 2022-07-06T20:38:49.418Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "useRatesEcommerce": false, "useNewApi": true } hasContentIssue true

Insights into Stress Corrosion Cracking Mechanisms from High-Resolution Measurements of Crack-tip Structures and Compositions

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011

Stephen Michael Bruemmer
Affiliation:
bruemmer@pnl.gov
Larry Thomas
Affiliation:
larry.thomas@pnl.gov, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington, United States
Get access

Abstract

Results are presented employing cross-sectional analytical transmission electron microscopy (ATEM) to examine intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) of austenitic stainless alloys in high-temperature water environments. Microstructural, chemical and crystallographic characterization of buried interfaces at near-atomic resolutions is used to investigate corrosion/oxidation reactions, composition changes and deformation events at crack tips. Information obtained by a wide variety of high-resolution imaging and analysis methods indicates the processes occurring during crack advance and provides insights into the mechanisms controlling SCC. Examples of crack tips produced in oxidizing and hydrogenated water are presented for both Fe-base stainless steels (SSs) and Ni-base stainless alloys. Cracks in SSs show similar characteristics in both environments, with oriented oxide films at crack walls and cracks ending in few-nm-wide tips. Many of these same features are seen for alloy 182 in oxidizing water suggesting a common mechanism, generally consistent with a slip oxidation process. A distinct difference is seen at alloy 600 and alloy 182 tips produced in hydrogenated water. Penetrative attack along grain boundaries without evidence for significant plastic deformation is believed to indicate a major role of active-path corrosion/oxidation in the SCC process.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2010

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

1 Lewis, N. Perry, D. J. and Bunch, M. L. Proc. Microscopy and Microanalysis 1995, ed., Bailey, G.W. et al. , Jones and Begnell Publishing, New York, 1995, p. 550.Google Scholar
2 Fish, J. S. Lewis, N. Yang, W. J. S. Perry, D. J. and Thompson, C. D. Proc. 8th. Int. Symp. Environmental Degradation in Nucl. Power Systems, ANS, 1997, p. 1997.Google Scholar
3 Lewis, N. Proc. Staehle Symposium on Chemistry and Electrochemistry of Corrosion and Stress Corrosion, The Minerals, Metals & Materials Society (TMS), 2001, p. 2001.Google Scholar
4 Thomas, L.E. Charlot, L.A. and Bruemmer, S.M. Proc. New Techniques for Characterizing Corrosion and Stress Corrosion, TMS, 1996, p. 1996.Google Scholar
5 Thomas, L. E. and Bruemmer, S. M. Corrosion J., 2000, 56, 572.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
6 Thomas, L. E. and Bruemmer, S. M. Proc. 9th Int. Conf. Environmental Degradation of Materials in Nuclear Power Systems in Water Reactors, TMS, 2000, p. 2000.Google Scholar
7 Bruemmer, S. M. and Thomas, L. E. Proc. Staehle Symposium on Chemistry and Electrochemistry of Corrosion and Stress Corrosion, TMS, 2001, p. 2001.Google Scholar
8 Bruemmer, S. M. and Thomas, L. E. J. Surface and Interface Analysis, 31 (2001) 571.10.1002/sia.1084CrossRefGoogle Scholar
9 Thomas, L. E. Gertsman, V. Y. and Bruemmer, S. M. Proc. 10th Int. Symp. Environmental Degradation of Materials in Nuclear Power Systems, NACE Int., 2002, paper 26.Google Scholar
10 Thomas, L.E. and Bruemmer, S.M. Fontevraud V Int. Symp. Contribution of Materials Investigation to the Resolution of Problems Encountered in PWRs, French Nuclear Energy Society, 2003, two papers: A – p. 347 and B – p. 1037.Google Scholar
11 Thomas, L. E. and Bruemmer, S. M. 11th Int. Conf. Environmental Degradation of Materials in Nucl. Power Systems, ANS, 2003, two papers: A – p. 1049 and B – p. 1212.Google Scholar
12 Bruemmer, S. M. and Thomas, L. E. Proc. 2nd Int. Conf. Environment-Induced Cracking of Metals, Volume 2, Elsevier, Oxford, 2007, p. 2007.Google Scholar
13 Bruemmer, S. M. and Thomas, L. E. Proc. 12th Int. Conf. Environmental Degradation of Materials in Nuclear Power Systems, TMS, 2005, A – p. 189, B – p. 567 and C – p. 1143.Google Scholar
14 Bruemmer, S. M. and Thomas, L. E. Proc. Fontevraud 6 Int. Symp. on Contributions of Materials Investigations to Improve the Safety and Performance of Light-Water Reactors, French Nuclear Energy Society, 2006, two papers: A – p. 553 and B – p. 603.Google Scholar
15 Thomas, L. E. Edwards, D. Asano, K. Ooki, S. and Bruemmer, S. M. Proc. 13th Int. Conf. Environmental Degradation of Materials in Nuclear Power Systems, Canadian Nuclear Society, 2007, paper 143.Google Scholar
16 Bruemmer, S. M. and Thomas, L. E. ibid 15, paper 144.Google Scholar
17 Toloczko, M. B. Andresen, P. L. and Bruemmer, S. M. ibid 15, paper 141.Google Scholar
18 Robertson, J. Corrosion Sci., 32–4 (1991) 443.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
19 Stellwag, B. Corrosion Sci., 40-2/3 (1998) 337.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
20 Pickering, H. W. and Kim, Y. S. Corrosion Sci., 22 (1982) 621.10.1016/0010-938X(82)90043-9CrossRefGoogle Scholar
21 Katsman, A. Grabke, H. Levin, L. and Werber, T. Materials Science Forum, Vol. 207-9, 1996, p. 1996.Google Scholar
22 Shida, Y. Wood, G. Stott, F. Whittle, D. and Bastow, B. Corrosion Sci, 21-3 (1981) 581.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
23 Thomas, L. E. Olszta, M. J. Johnson, B. R. and Bruemmer, S. M. Proc. 14th Int. Conf. Environmental Degradation of Materials in Nuclear Power Systems, ANS, 2009, in press.Google Scholar

Save article to Kindle

To save this article to your Kindle, first ensure coreplatform@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about saving to your Kindle.

Note you can select to save to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be saved to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Insights into Stress Corrosion Cracking Mechanisms from High-Resolution Measurements of Crack-tip Structures and Compositions
Available formats
×

Save article to Dropbox

To save this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Dropbox account. Find out more about saving content to Dropbox.

Insights into Stress Corrosion Cracking Mechanisms from High-Resolution Measurements of Crack-tip Structures and Compositions
Available formats
×

Save article to Google Drive

To save this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you used this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your Google Drive account. Find out more about saving content to Google Drive.

Insights into Stress Corrosion Cracking Mechanisms from High-Resolution Measurements of Crack-tip Structures and Compositions
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *