Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-564cf476b6-zvgck Total loading time: 0.212 Render date: 2021-06-21T07:43:55.304Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true }

Importance of Electrostatic Interactions Between Calcite Surfaces and Proteins

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 February 2011

Aleiandro Rodripuez-Navarro
Affiliation:
The PennState Univ, Materials Research Lab, PA, anava@ugr.es
Russell Messier
Affiliation:
The PennState Univ, Materials Research Lab, PA, anava@ugr.es
Concepcion Jimenez-Lopez
Affiliation:
Univ of Granada, IACT-CSIC, Granada, SPAIN
Juan Manuel Garcia-Ruiz
Affiliation:
Univ of Granada, IACT-CSIC, Granada, SPAIN
Corresponding
E-mail address:
Get access

Abstract

We have studied the electrostatic interactions of proteins with the calcite surfaces during its subsequent nucleation and growth on a surface. In doing so, a model system of four globular proteins (lysozyme, ribonuclease, myoglobin and α-lactalbumin), having the same size and conformation, but differing in surface properties (i.e. surface charge) was used. Depending on the nature of the charge on the protein, its morphological effect on calcite growth (inhibition of specific crystal faces) varies, with this effect becoming more pronounced as the protein is more negatively charged. To study how the adsorption of proteins affects the growth of calcite along different crystal directions, calcite plates cut with different crystallographic orientations (i.e. (001), (104), (100) and (110)) were used as substrates. The overgrowing calcite crystals show the same orientation as the substrate. The nucleation density also varies with the crystallographic orientation of the calcite substrates, increasing in accordance with the sequence: (110), (100) and (001). Finally, to study how the protein itself controls the orientation of crystals, we used amorphous substrates (glass). After incubation on the glass substrates with negatively charged proteins, an oriented nucleation of the calcite crystals was induced.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2000

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

1 Addadi, L. and Weiner, S., Nature 389, 912 (1992).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
2 Addadi, L. and Weiner, S.. Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 31, 153 (1992);CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Belcher, A.M., Wu, X.H., Christensen, R.J., Hansma, P.K., Stucky, G.D., Morse, D.E., Nature 381, 56 (1996);Google Scholar
Falini, G., Albeck, S., Weiner, S., Addadi, L.. Science 271, 67 (1996).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
3 Bunker, B.C., Rieke, P.C., Tarasevich, B.J., Campbell, A.A., Fryxell, G.E., Graff, G.L., Song, L., Lui, J., Virden, J.W., McVay, G.L.. Science 264, 48 (1994).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
4 Mann, S., Archivald, D.D., Didymus, J.M., Douglas, T., Heywood, B.R., Meldrum, F.C., Reeves, N.J., Science 261, 1286 (1993).Google Scholar
5 Norde, W., and Lyklema, J.. J. Biomater. Sci. Polymer Edn. 2, 183 (1991)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
6 Aizenberg, J., Albeck, S., Weiner, S., L. Addadi.. J. Crys. Growth 142, 156 (1994); A. Berman, J. Hanson, L. Leiserowitz, T.F. Koetzie, S. Weiner, L. Addadi. Science 259, 778 (1993).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
7 Addadi, L. and Weiner, S.. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 82, 4110 (1987).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
8 Arai, T., Norde, W.. Colloids and Surfaces 51, 1 (1990).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
9 See ref 3Google Scholar
10 Berman, A., Addadi, L., Kvick, A., Leiserowitz, L., Nelson, M., Weiner, S.. Science 250, 664 (1990).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
11 Addadi, L., Moradian, J., Shay, E., Maroudas, N. G., Weiner, S.. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 84, 2732 (1987).Google Scholar

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Importance of Electrostatic Interactions Between Calcite Surfaces and Proteins
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Importance of Electrostatic Interactions Between Calcite Surfaces and Proteins
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Importance of Electrostatic Interactions Between Calcite Surfaces and Proteins
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *