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Identification of the Location of Conductive Filaments Formed in Pt/NiO/Pt Resistive Switching Cells and Investigation on Their Properties

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  25 May 2012

Tatsuya Iwata
Affiliation:
Department of Electronic Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan
Yusuke Nishi
Affiliation:
Department of Electronic Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan
Tsunenobu Kimoto
Affiliation:
Department of Electronic Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan Photonics and Electronics Science and Engineering Center, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan
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Abstract

Exact locations of conductive filaments formed in NiO-based resistive switching (RS) cells were detected by C-AFM, and their electrical as well as chemical properties were investigated. After a forming process, a part of top electrodes of Pt/NiO/Pt RS cells is deformed. NiO layers are also deformed, and conductive spots, i.e. filaments have been found preferentially along the edges of deformations. Detailed C-AFM investigation has revealed that variation of cell resistances originates from differences in size and shape of filaments, not their resistivity. Furthermore, cross-sectional TEM analysis has demonstrated that filaments determining cell resistance consist of reduced NiO with an inclusion of Pt.

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Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2012

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Identification of the Location of Conductive Filaments Formed in Pt/NiO/Pt Resistive Switching Cells and Investigation on Their Properties
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