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High-temperature Fiber Matrix Composites for Reduction of Radiation Heat Transfer

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  31 January 2011

Valery Shklover
Affiliation:
v.shklover@mat.ethz.ch, ETH Zurich, Laboratory of Crystallography, Department of Materials, Zürich, Switzerland
Leonid Braginsky
Affiliation:
leonid.braginsky@mat.ethz.ch, ETH Zurich, Laboratory of Crystallography, Department of Materials, Zürich, Switzerland
Matthew Mishrikey
Affiliation:
matthewm@ifh.ee.ethz.ch, ETH Zurich, Laboratory of Electromagnetic Fields and Microwave Electronics, Zurich, Switzerland
Christian Hafner
Affiliation:
christian.hafner@ifh.ee.ethz.ch, ETH Zurich, Laboratory of Electromagnetic Fields and Microwave Electronics, Zurich, Switzerland
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Abstract

Recent progress in fabrication technology allows for the efficient control of electromagnetic waves by means of photonic devices. This could be attractive and promising also for high-temperature photonic structures to control electromagnetic heat transfer at temperatures above 1000 oC. We discuss the literature and present our own results on Fiber Matrix Composites (FMC), which could be superior to high-temperature metals or monolithic ceramics and can be designed for photonic applications. Possible applications include the protection of non-rotating components in high-temperature engines and turbines such as combustors and liners, coatings and parts for aerospace vehicles. Our discussion includes the material aspect and some relevant structure features. The use of woven fabrics to design new photonic band gap structures is discussed. An example of the use of the plane-wave expansion method for FMC design is given.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2009

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References

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