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Highly Efficient Nitrogen Doping Into GaAs Using Low-Energy Nitrogen Molecular Ions

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 February 2011

Takayuki Shima
Affiliation:
Electrotechnical Laboratory, 1-1-4 Umezono, Tsukuba 305-8568, Japan Industrial Technology Researcher of the New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization
Yunosuke Makita
Affiliation:
Electrotechnical Laboratory, 1-1-4 Umezono, Tsukuba 305-8568, Japan
Shinji Kimura
Affiliation:
Electrotechnical Laboratory, 1-1-4 Umezono, Tsukuba 305-8568, Japan
Hirokazu Sanpei
Affiliation:
Electrotechnical Laboratory, 1-1-4 Umezono, Tsukuba 305-8568, Japan On leave from Tokai University, 1117 Kitakaname, Hiratsuka 259-1292, Japan
Yasuhiro Fukuzawa
Affiliation:
Electrotechnical Laboratory, 1-1-4 Umezono, Tsukuba 305-8568, Japan On leave from Nippon Institute of Technology, 4-1 Gakuendai, Miyashiro, Minamisaitama 345-8501, Japan
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Abstract

Low-energy N2+ molecular-ions were irradiated during the epitaxial growth of GaAs. Ion acceleration energy and ion beam current density were varied in the range of 30-200 eV and 3-37 nA/cm2, respectively. GaAs growth rate was kept constant at 1µm/ h and the thickness of N-doped GaAs layer was about 1 µm. N concentration was obtained by using secondary ion mass spectroscopy. Strong N-related emissions were observed in the low-temperature photoluminescence spectra, which indicates that N atom is efficiently substituted at As site and is optically active as an isoelectronic impurity

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1998

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