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High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy of GaAs/AlAs Hetero-Structures in the <110> Projection

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 February 2011

N. Ikarashi
Affiliation:
Fundamental Research Laboratories, NEC Corporation, 34 Miyukigaoka, Tsukuba 305, Japan
A. Sakai
Affiliation:
Fundamental Research Laboratories, NEC Corporation, 34 Miyukigaoka, Tsukuba 305, Japan
T. Baba
Affiliation:
Fundamental Research Laboratories, NEC Corporation, 34 Miyukigaoka, Tsukuba 305, Japan
K. Ishida
Affiliation:
Fundamental Research Laboratories, NEC Corporation, 34 Miyukigaoka, Tsukuba 305, Japan
J. Motohisa
Affiliation:
Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo, 7-22-1 Roppongi, Minatoku, Tokyo 106, Japan
H. Sakaki
Affiliation:
Institute of Industrial Science, University of Tokyo, 7-22-1 Roppongi, Minatoku, Tokyo 106, Japan
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Abstract

High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) of GaAs/AlAs hetero-structures grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) is carried out in the <110> projection. It is shown that GaAs and AlAs are distinguished clearly by the difference in their lattice images at the samples thicknesses of about 15–30 nm under near Scherzer focus condition. Under these imaging conditions, very thin films consist of single monolayer AlAs are observed. Vicinal interfaces of GaAs/AlAs which were grown on (001) substrate misoriented toward [110] are also examined in the [110] projection. The interfacial structures are imaged edgeon, so that the fluctuations of terrace width, and the roughness of step-edges at these interfaces are observed on an atomic scale.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1990

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