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Growth of Ultra-High Density 3C-SiC Nanowires via Single Source CVD

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 July 2011

Kasif Teker
Affiliation:
Department of Physics and Engineering, Frostburg State University, 101 Braddock Road, Frostburg, MD 21532, U.S.A.
Joseph A. Oxenham
Affiliation:
Department of Physics and Engineering, Frostburg State University, 101 Braddock Road, Frostburg, MD 21532, U.S.A.
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Abstract

Silicon carbide (SiC) nanostructures attract interest due to their applications in optoelectronic devices, sensors, and high-power/high temperature electronics. The synthesis of SiC nanowires by chemical vapor deposition using hexamethyldisilane (HMDS) as a source material on SiO2/Si substrate has been investigated. Various catalyst materials, including iron (film and nanoparticles), nickel (film and nanoparticles), and cobalt nanoparticles have been used. The growth runs have been carried out at temperatures between 900 and 1100°C under H2 as carrier gas. 3C-SiC nanowires have successfully been grown at even lower temperatures despite the lower efficiency of source decomposition at low temperatures. The SiC nanowire diameters are in the range of 8 nm to 60 nm, as determined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In general, the efficiency of nanowire growth has increased with temperature except the growth on Ni film, which has occasionally resulted in SiC flowers. Higher nanowire density at high temperatures can be attributed to more efficient decomposition of the source at higher temperatures. Further, optical properties of the nanowires have been studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The fabricated nanowires have also been characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and x-ray diffraction (XRD).

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2011

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