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Gelation Point In Borosilicate Sols From Rheological Experiments

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 February 2011

Srinivas Surapanani
Affiliation:
Department of Chemical Engineering, Michigan Technological University, Houghton,MI 49931
Michael E. Mullins
Affiliation:
Department of Chemical Engineering, Michigan Technological University, Houghton,MI 49931
Faith Morrison
Affiliation:
Department of Chemical Engineering, Michigan Technological University, Houghton,MI 49931
Bahne C. Cornilsen
Affiliation:
Department of Chemistry, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, MI 49931
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Abstract

Dynamic oscillatory experiments are used to monitor the gelation of the borosilicate systems prepared through the sol-gel process from metal alkoxides. The rheological experiments show that tan δ = G”/G’ is independent of frequency at the gel point in agreement with the results of others on organic gelling systems. The dynamic moduli at the gel point followed power-law behavior with respect to frequency. The power-law exponent is found to be ∼0.70. The apparent fractal dimension, dp, of the network cluster at the gel point is determined. The dF values for the samples ranged from 2.5 to 3.8 depending on the final structure of the evolved products at the gel point. The large values (dF > 3) exclude a simple geometric interpretation of the results. The effect of processing parameters, such as composition of reactants and temperature, on the resulting microstructures near the gel point is discussed.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1998

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