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Functional Recovery Following Spinal Cord Hemisection Mediated by a Unique Polymer Scaffold Seeded with Neural Stem Cells

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 March 2011

Erin Lavik
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, MIT
Yang D. Teng
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology, Children's Hospital, Boston
David Zurakowski
Affiliation:
Department of Orthopedics, Children's Hospital, Boston;
Xianlu Qu
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology, Children's Hospital, Boston
Evan Snyder
Affiliation:
Department of Neurology, Children's Hospital, Boston
Robert Langer
Affiliation:
Department of Chemical Engineering, MIT
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Abstract

A dual scaffold structure made of biodegradable polymers and seeded with neural stem cells has been developed to address the issues of spinal cord injury including axonal severance and the loss of neurons and glia. The general design of the scaffold is derived the structure of the spinal cord with an outer section which mimics the white matter with long axial pores to provide axonal guidance and an inner section seeded with neural stem cells to address the issues of cell replacement and mimic the general character of the gray matter. The seeded scaffold leads to improved functional recovery as compared with the lesion control or cells alone following spinal cord injury.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2001

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