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Fracture Transfer of Vertical Semiconductor Pillar Arrays to Low Cost Arbitrary Substrates for Flexible Energy Device Applications

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 March 2011

Logeeswaran VJ
Affiliation:
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California-Davis, CA 95616.
Matthew Ombaba
Affiliation:
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California-Davis, CA 95616.
M.Saif Islam
Affiliation:
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California-Davis, CA 95616.
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Abstract

In this paper, we demonstrate a heterogeneous integration technique that preserves the integrity, order, shape, and fidelity of vertically aligned single-crystal semiconductor micro- and nano- pillars by harvesting and transferring them from a single crystal substrate to a low-cost carrier substrate. The mechanism of the transfer technique exploits a combination of vertical embossing and lateral fracturing of the crystalline pillars with the assistance of a spin-coated polymer layer on a carrier substrate as well as facilitating multilayer process device integration. Specifically, the novel use of a water soluble adhesive polymer from MasterBond that acts simultaneously as a mechanical transfer polymer and as a sacrificial harvest layer further expands the versatility of this approach. Arrays of vertical micropillars of average height ~15)μm and diameter ~1.5μm on a die silicon substrate of 5mm x 5mm were fabricated via transformative top-down approaches (DRIE) on a single crystal silicon substrate and then transferred to a different target carrier substrate using the adhesive polymer assisted bendingfracturing process. The adhesive polymer is odorless, non-conducting, easy to process, spincoatable, optically transparent, resistant to heat, high mechanical strength and easily cures at room temperature. The original pillar wafers may be used repeatedly after polishing for generating more devices and are minimally consumed. Low contact resistances are formed for electrical addressing using metals and conducting thermoplastics of Ag nanoparticles. This heterogeneous integration technique potentially offers enhanced photon semiconductor interactions, while enabling multimaterial integration such as silicon with compound semiconductors (InP, GaAs etc.) for applications, including high speed electronics, low-cost and flexible electronics, displays, tactile sensors, and energy conversion systems.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2011

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Fracture Transfer of Vertical Semiconductor Pillar Arrays to Low Cost Arbitrary Substrates for Flexible Energy Device Applications
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