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Forces between Dislocations due to Dislocation Core Fields

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 March 2011

Charles H. Henager Jr.
Affiliation:
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, WA 99335-0999
Richard G. Hoagland
Affiliation:
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, WA 99335-0999
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Abstract

Atomistic dislocation models were used to determine the properties of dislocation core fields in Al using an EAM potential. Equilibrium atom configurations were compared with initial configurations displaced according to the Volterra field to determine core displacement fields for edge, screw, and mixed (60° and 30°) geometries. The core field was approximated by a line force defect field lying parallel to the dislocation line direction. Best-fit parameters for the core fields were obtained in terms of the anisotropic elastic solution for a line force defect, from which the line force strengths and the origin of the line forces were determined. The line force stress fields were then used to compute the forces between dislocations for several dislocation configurations. The Volterra field dominates beyond 50b but core field forces modify the equilibrium angle of edge dislocation dipoles and determine the force between otherwise noninteracting edge and screw dislocations at distances out to 50b compared to the Volterra-only forces.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2001

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References

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