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Electrostatic Force Microscopy of Nanofibers and Carbon Nanotubes: Quantitative Analysis Using Theory and Experiment

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 February 2011

Sujit Sankar Datta
Affiliation:
sdatta2@sas.upenn.edu, University of Pennsylvania, Physics and Astronomy, 2121 Market Street, Apartment 224, Philadelphia, PA, 19103, United States
Cristian Staii
Affiliation:
cstaii@wisc.edu, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Department of Physics, Madison, WI, 53706, United States
Nicholas J. Pinto
Affiliation:
nj_pinto@uprh.edu, University of Puerto Rico, Department of Physics and Electronics, Humacao, 00791-4300, Puerto Rico
Douglas R. Strachan
Affiliation:
drstrach@sas.upenn.edu, University of Pennsylvania, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Philadelphia, PA, 19104, United States
AT Charlie Johnson
Affiliation:
cjohnson@physics.upenn.edu, University of Pennsylvania, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Philadelphia, PA, 19104, United States
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Abstract

Electrostatic force microscopy (EFM) is a widely used scanning-probe technique for the characterization of electronic properties of nanoscale samples without the use of electrical contacts. Here we review the basic principles of EFM, developing a quantitative framework by which EFM measurements of extended nanostructures can be understood. We support our calculations with experimental data of EFM of carbon nanotubes and conducting or insulating electrospun polyaniline-based nanofibers. Furthermore, we explore routes towards extending EFM as a means of non-invasively probing the local electronic density of states of carbon nanotubes.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2008

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References

1. Staii, C., Pinto, N. J., and Johnson, A. T., Nano Lett. 4, 859 (2004).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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Electrostatic Force Microscopy of Nanofibers and Carbon Nanotubes: Quantitative Analysis Using Theory and Experiment
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