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Effects of Halogen-Containing Gas Plasma and Rapid Thermal Anneal Treatment on the Reactive Ion Etched Silicon

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  22 February 2011

Kwang-Ho Kwon
Affiliation:
Semiconductor Technology Division, ETRI, P. O. Box 8, Daeduk Science Town, Taejon, 305-606, Korea
Bo-Woo Kim
Affiliation:
Semiconductor Technology Division, ETRI, P. O. Box 8, Daeduk Science Town, Taejon, 305-606, Korea
Hyung-Ho Park
Affiliation:
Semiconductor Technology Division, ETRI, P. O. Box 8, Daeduk Science Town, Taejon, 305-606, Korea
Jin-Yeong Kang
Affiliation:
Semiconductor Technology Division, ETRI, P. O. Box 8, Daeduk Science Town, Taejon, 305-606, Korea
Gun-Yung Yeom
Affiliation:
Dept. of Materials Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon, Korea
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Abstract

The effects of SF6 and NF3 gas plasma treatments, and succesive rapid thermal anneal (RTA) treatment for the recovery of modified silicon surface due to CHF3/C2F6 plasma have been investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS). XPS analyses have revealed that NF3 and SF6 plasma treatments are effective for the removal of residue layer. SIMS results show that penetrated impurities in the contaminated silicon substrate reduce through the additional RTA treatment. The effects of NF3, SF6 plasmas, and additional RTA treatments for the recovery of reactive ion etched silicon surface has been also studied by measuring the electrical performance of the silicon devices.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1994

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