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Effect of Nitrogen Content on Interfacial Adhesion of the Ta/SiO2 Interface

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 February 2011

Michael Lane
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University
Reiner Dauskardt
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University
Nety Krishna
Affiliation:
Applied Materials, Santa Clara, CA
Imran Hashim
Affiliation:
Applied Materials, Santa Clara, CA
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Abstract

With the advent of copper metallization in interconnect structures, new barrier layers are required to prevent copper diffusion into the adjacent dielectrics as well as the underlying silicon. These barriers must not only prevent interdiffusion but also provide adequate adhesion to both the dielectric and copper. Ta and TaN have received considerable attention as barrier layers in copper metallization schemes. While much has been reported on their diffusion properties, little or no quantitative data exists on their adhesive properties. We present data on both the interface fracture energy and the subcritical debonding of ionmetal- plasma sputtered Ta and TaN films on thermal silicon oxide. Data is also presented showing the significant effect of interfacial chemistry, particularly varying nitrogen contents at the TaN/SiO2 interface.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1999

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References

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