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Diffusion and Activation During Rapid Thermal Annealing of Implanted Boron in Silicon

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 February 2011

N E B Cowern
Affiliation:
GEC Research Ltd., Hirst Research Centre, Wembley, Middx. HA9 7PP, UK
K J Yallup
Affiliation:
GEC Research Ltd., Hirst Research Centre, Wembley, Middx. HA9 7PP, UK
D J Godfrey
Affiliation:
GEC Research Ltd., Hirst Research Centre, Wembley, Middx. HA9 7PP, UK
D G Hasko
Affiliation:
Microelectronics Research Laboratory, Cambridge University, Cambridge Science Park, Milton Road, Cambridge, CB4 4BH, UK
R A McMahon
Affiliation:
Microelectronics Research Laboratory, Cambridge University, Cambridge Science Park, Milton Road, Cambridge, CB4 4BH, UK
H Ahmed
Affiliation:
GEC Research Ltd., Hirst Research Centre, Wembley, Middx. HA9 7PP, UK
W M Stobbs
Affiliation:
Dept of Metallurgy & Materials Science, Cambridge University, Pembroke Street, Cambridge, CB2 2QN
D S McPhail
Affiliation:
City of London Polytechnic, 31 Jewry Street, London EC2N 2EY, UK
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Abstract

The diffusion and activation of implanted boron in silicon during rapid thermal annealing (RTA) has been studied using the analytical techniques of SIMS, TEM, and sheet resistance measurements. Both crystalline and pre-amorphised silicon substrates were investigated. Data analysis in conjunction with a range of numerical models indicates some novel features of boron RTA, as well as accounting for previously observed features. In particular, a large transient diffusion enhancement coupled with an increase of electrical activity, are seen at short anneal times, in the case of crystalline silicon substrates. A non-equilibrium diffusion enhancement of a different type is also seen at much longer times, in both crystalline and pre-amorphised samples implanted to high doses. This second enhancement persists after all the precipitated boron formed on implantation has become substitutional. TEM studies show that the transient enhancement may be associated with the evolution of extended defect structures during the early stages of annealing. Both types of enhancement can be well represented by multiplying the ‘normal’ concentration-dependent diffusivity (with β=0.5) by a factor f>1.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1986

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References

1 McMillan, G.B., Shannon, J.M., Clegg, J.B. and Ahmed, H., J. Appl. Phys., To be published (1986)Google Scholar
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7 Seidel, T.E. and MacRae, A.U., Proc. 1st Int. Conf. on Ion Implantation in Semiconductors, Thousand Oaks, CA (Gordon and Breach, New York, 1970)Google Scholar
8 Cowern, N.E.B., Yallup, K.J. and Godfrey, D.J., to be publishedGoogle Scholar
9 Hasko, D.G., McMahon, R.A., Ahmed, H., Stobbs, W.M. and Godfrey, D.J., U.K. Inst. Phys. Conf. Ser. 76, Section 3, 1985, p. 99 Google Scholar

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