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Crystallization and Melting in Multilayered Structures

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  25 February 2011

W. Sevenhans
Affiliation:
Laboratorium voor Vaste Stof-Fysika en Magnetisme, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, B-3030 Leuven, Belgium
H. Vanderstraeten
Affiliation:
Laboratorium voor Vaste Stof-Fysika en Magnetisme, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, B-3030 Leuven, Belgium
J. P. Locquet
Affiliation:
Laboratorium voor Vaste Stof-Fysika en Magnetisme, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, B-3030 Leuven, Belgium
Y. Bruynseraede
Affiliation:
Laboratorium voor Vaste Stof-Fysika en Magnetisme, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, B-3030 Leuven, Belgium
H. Homma
Affiliation:
Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, U.S.A.
Ivan K. Scihuller
Affiliation:
Physics Departement-B019, University of California-San Diego, LaJolla, California 92093, U.S.A.
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Abstract

The stability of Pb/Ge and Pb/C multilayers has been studied over a broad temperature range by x-ray diffraction experiments. In the Pb/Ge system an amorphous to microcrystalline phase transformation of the Ge-layers was already observed at ≃ 100 °C. This transition destroys the modulation structure and improves the Pb(111) texture. In the Pb/C multilayers, the layered structure was still present at temperatures higher than the melting temperature of Pb. Contrary to recent publications, no depression of the melting temperature of the two-dimensional Pb layers could be observed.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1988

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References

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