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Cross-sectional TEM and corrosion studies of Al and N implanted copper

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  25 February 2011

E. Gerritsen
Affiliation:
Philips Research Labs., P.O. Box 80.000, 5600 JA EINDHOVEN, The Netherlands.
H. J. Ligthart
Affiliation:
Philips Research Labs., P.O. Box 80.000, 5600 JA EINDHOVEN, The Netherlands.
T. E. G. Deenen
Affiliation:
Philips Research Labs., P.O. Box 80.000, 5600 JA EINDHOVEN, The Netherlands.
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Abstract

Poly- and single crystalline copper was implanted with aluminium and nitrogen at doses ranging from 1016 to 5 × 1017 at/cm2 and energies of 170 keV. The corrosion resistance of the implanted surfaces was tested by exposure to an H25-containing atmosphere. The amount of copper sulphide formed was measured by chrono potentiometric reduction. The amount of corrosion products was markedly reduced (up to a factor 50) by high dose implantations of aluminium. The microstructure of the implanted copper was examined by Transmission Electron Microscopy of cross-sectioned specimens. A deep damage layer far exceeding the ion range was observed. XTEM-pictures of aluminium implanted copper single crystals of various orientations suggest a channeling mechanism for this deep damage layer. In situ annealing of the specimens in the TEM showed that most of the implantation damage is removed at 600°C except for an array of dislocations at the end of the damage range.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1987

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