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Control of Second-Order Nonlinear Optical Susceptibility in Ionically Self-Assembled Films by pH and Ionic Strength

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 March 2011

C. Figura
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061-0435
P.J. Neyman
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061-0435
D. Marciu
Affiliation:
Luna Innovations, Inc. P.O. Box 11704, Blacksburg, VA 24062-1704
C. Brands
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061-0435
M.A. Murray
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061-0435
S. Hair
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061-0435
M.B. Miller
Affiliation:
Luna Innovations, Inc. P.O. Box 11704, Blacksburg, VA 24062-1704
R.M. Davis
Affiliation:
Department of Chemical Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061-0211
J.R. Heflin
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061-0435
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Abstract

Ionically self-assembled monolayers have been recently shown to spontaneously produce the noncentrosymmetric ordering that is required for a second order nonlinear optical (NLO) response. The precise thickness of each monolayer is determined by variables such as the pH and ionic strength of the immersion solutions. We show here that the relationship between polymer conformation and layer thickness dramatically affects the magnitude of the NLO response. The largest χ(2) values are found in the thinnest films, indicating that the NLO response is determined primarily by chromophores located at the layer interfaces, as opposed to those within the bulk of a layer.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1999

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References

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Control of Second-Order Nonlinear Optical Susceptibility in Ionically Self-Assembled Films by pH and Ionic Strength
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Control of Second-Order Nonlinear Optical Susceptibility in Ionically Self-Assembled Films by pH and Ionic Strength
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Control of Second-Order Nonlinear Optical Susceptibility in Ionically Self-Assembled Films by pH and Ionic Strength
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