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Comparison of Carbon and Metal Oxide Anode Materials for Rechargeable Li-Ion Cells

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 February 2011

C.-K. Huang
Affiliation:
Jet Propulsion Lab., California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109
J. S. Sakamoto
Affiliation:
University of California, Irvine, Dept. of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Irvine, CA 92697–2575
M. C. Smart
Affiliation:
Jet Propulsion Lab., California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109
S. Surampudi
Affiliation:
Jet Propulsion Lab., California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109
J. Wolfenstine
Affiliation:
University of California, Irvine, Dept. of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Irvine, CA 92697–2575
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Abstract

The state of the art (SOA) Li-ion cells utilize carbon anodes. However, to improve specific energy, energy density, and safety of cells using carbon anodes, alternative anodes must be developed. Recently, Fuji Film Inc. has suggested the use of tin oxide based anodes in Li-ion cells. It is believed mat cells containing tin oxide based anodes have the potential to meet the need for NASA's future missions. As a result, we conducted an analysis to compare the performance of cells containing carbon anodes and cells containing tin oxide anodes. The comparison between these cells involved the following: 1) reaction mechanisms between Li and carbon and reaction mechanisms between Li and tin oxide, 2) half-cell and full-cell performance characteristics, 3) interactions between the anode materials and electrolyte types and compositions, and 4) the optimization of binder composition.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1998

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References

1. Idota, Yoshio, etc., European Patent # 0651450A1.Google Scholar
2. Idota, Yoshio, Kubota, Tadahiko, Matsufuji, Akihiro, maekawa, Yukio, and Miyasaka, Tsutomu, Science, 276, 1395 (1997).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
3. Courtney, I. A., Wilson, A. M., Xing, W. and Dahn, J. R., Paper presented in the Electrochemical Society Fall Meeting held at San Antonio, Texas, Oct. 611, 1996.Google Scholar
4. Courtney, Ian A. and Dahn, J. R., J. Electrochem. Soc., 144, 2045 (1997).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
5. Sakamoto, J. S., Master's thesis, University of California, Irvine (1997).Google Scholar

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Comparison of Carbon and Metal Oxide Anode Materials for Rechargeable Li-Ion Cells
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