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Characterisation of Collagen Scaffolds using X-ray Microtomography

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  11 February 2011

Patrick J. Smith
Affiliation:
Manchester Materials Science Centre, UMIST and University of Manchester, Grosvenor Street, Manchester, M1 7HS, England.
Eleftherios Sachlos
Affiliation:
Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PH, England.
Samuel McDonald
Affiliation:
Manchester Materials Science Centre, UMIST and University of Manchester, Grosvenor Street, Manchester, M1 7HS, England.
Nuno Reis
Affiliation:
Manchester Materials Science Centre, UMIST and University of Manchester, Grosvenor Street, Manchester, M1 7HS, England.
Brian Derby
Affiliation:
Manchester Materials Science Centre, UMIST and University of Manchester, Grosvenor Street, Manchester, M1 7HS, England.
Paul M. Mummery
Affiliation:
Manchester Materials Science Centre, UMIST and University of Manchester, Grosvenor Street, Manchester, M1 7HS, England.
Jan T. Czernuszka
Affiliation:
Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Parks Road, Oxford, OX1 3PH, England.
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Abstract

Collagen scaffolds have been produced that incorporate predefined internal channels. The scaffolds were obtained with the aid of sacrificial moulds that have been manufactured using a rapid prototyping technique. A computer aided design file of the mould was created and then realised using an ink-jet printer. A dispersion of collagen was then cast into the mould and frozen. Ethanol was used to dissolve the mould leaving the collagen, which was then freeze dried to produce the final product. The scaffold was then analysed using X-ray microtomography (XMT) to determine whether the desired internal structure was obtained. It was found necessary to add saturated potassium iodide (KI) solution to the scaffold in order to analyse it satisfactorily by XMT. The resultant images indicate that the desired internal structure was obtained.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2003

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