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Boundary Layer Temperature Profile in Diamond CVD System Using Laser-Induced Fluorescence

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  10 February 2011

Qingyu Wang
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455
Jon L. Lindsay
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455
David L. Hofeldt
Affiliation:
Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455
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Abstract

The gas temperature of a radio-frequency thermal plasma has been measured by laser-induced fluorescence along the axis of the plasma jet near the substrate surface. The temperature was determined from the rotational population distribution of OH radicals. From the measured temperature profile, the freestream temperature was found to be about 3400 K and the boundary layer thickness was determined to be about 1 mm. A numerical model including carbonhydrogen- argon kinetics was used to predict species concentrations near the surface of the substrate. The results indicate that all CHa radical concentrations increase with freestream temperature for temperatures between 2500-4000 K. Of the C1 radicals, methyl has the highest concentration in this range in our system, which is consistent with other reports that methyl is an important diamond growth species.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1996

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