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Application of Thin-Film Micromachining for Large-Area Substrates

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 February 2011

M. Boucinha
Affiliation:
Instituto de Engenharia de Sistemas e Computadores (INESC), R. Alves Redol, 9, 1100 Lisboa, Portugal, mjgb@eniac.inesc.pt
V. Chu
Affiliation:
Instituto de Engenharia de Sistemas e Computadores (INESC), R. Alves Redol, 9, 1100 Lisboa, Portugal, mjgb@eniac.inesc.pt
V. Soares
Affiliation:
Instituto de Engenharia de Sistemas e Computadores (INESC), R. Alves Redol, 9, 1100 Lisboa, Portugal, mjgb@eniac.inesc.pt
J. P. Condee
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Engineering, Instituto Superior Técnico (IST), Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa, Portugal
Corresponding
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Abstract

Surface micromachining is used with amorphous silicon, microcrystalline silicon, silicon nitride and aluminum films as structural materials to form bridge and cantilever structures. Low temperature processing (between 110 and 250 °C) allowed fabrication of structures and devices on glass substrates. Two processes involving different materials as the sacrificial layer are presented: silicon nitride and photoresist. The mechanical integrity of the fabricated structures is discussed. As examples of possible device applications of this technology, air-gap thin film transistors and the electrostatic actuation of bridges and cantilevers are presented.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1999

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Application of Thin-Film Micromachining for Large-Area Substrates
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