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Amorphous Silicon Solar Cell Techniques for High Temperature and/or Reactive Deposition Conditions

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  15 February 2011

M. Kanbe
Affiliation:
Department of Innovative and Engineered Materials, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midoriku, Yokohama 226, Japan
T. Komaru
Affiliation:
Department of Innovative and Engineered Materials, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midoriku, Yokohama 226, Japan
K. Fukutani
Affiliation:
Department of Innovative and Engineered Materials, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midoriku, Yokohama 226, Japan
T. Kamiya
Affiliation:
Department of Innovative and Engineered Materials, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midoriku, Yokohama 226, Japan
C.M. Fortmann
Affiliation:
Department of Innovative and Engineered Materials, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midoriku, Yokohama 226, Japan
I. Shimizu
Affiliation:
Department of Innovative and Engineered Materials, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midoriku, Yokohama 226, Japan
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Abstract

Several promising new methods for amorphous silicon solar cell preparation involve high substrate temperatures and/or very reactive atmospheres. When incorporated into solar cells, the performance of these layers has often been less than expected due to enhanced diffusion and/or chemical reactions. This poor performance results from the harsh deposition environments. Deleterious effects include darken of TCO coated glass substrates due to hydrogen diffusion to and hydrogen reduction at the TCO interface when solar cells are prepared in the p-i-n deposition sequence. Alternatively, the deposition of TCO layers onto amorphous layers also involves rather harsh oxidizing conditions that have a deleterious effect on the top most amorphous silicon-based p-layers. Strategic use of blocking layers results in remarkably improved solar cell performance. A thin Cr layer (probably becoming Cr 2 O 3) shows ability to improve the performance of both n-ip and p-i-n solar cells by inhibiting both O and H diffusion.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 1999

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References

1. Yang, J., Banerjee, A., Glatfelter, T., Sugiyama, S., Guha, S., Conference Record of the 26th IEEE Photovoltaic Specialists Conference 1997, IEEE, Piscataway, NJ p.563 Google Scholar
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4. Gibbons, J., Stanford University, private communication 1997 Google Scholar
5. Borg, Richard J. & Dienes, G.J., An Introduction to Solid State Diffusion, 1988, Academic Press, NY 206207 Google Scholar
6. Kanbe, Mika, Master Thesis, 1999, Tokyo Institute of TechnologyGoogle Scholar
7. Dickerson, R. E., Molecular Thermodynamics, 1969 W.A. Benjamin, Inc., Menlo Park CA Google Scholar

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