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Simultaneous insulation and modification of quartz tuning fork surface by single-step plasma polymerization technique with amine-rich precursors

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 April 2018

Gizem Kaleli Can
Affiliation:
Plasma Aided Biomedical Research Group (pabmed), Biomedical Engineering Division, Graduate School of Science and Technology, TOBB University of Economics and Technology, Ankara 06560, Turkey
Hatice Ferda Özgüzar
Affiliation:
Plasma Aided Biomedical Research Group (pabmed), Biomedical Engineering Division, Graduate School of Science and Technology, TOBB University of Economics and Technology, Ankara 06560, Turkey
Gözde Kabay
Affiliation:
Plasma Aided Biomedical Research Group (pabmed), Biomedical Engineering Division, Graduate School of Science and Technology, TOBB University of Economics and Technology, Ankara 06560, Turkey
Pelin Kömürcü
Affiliation:
Plasma Aided Biomedical Research Group (pabmed), Micro- and Nano-Technology Division, Graduate School of Science and Technology, TOBB University of Economics and Technology, Ankara 06560, Turkey
Mehmet Mutlu
Affiliation:
Biomedical Engineering Department, Engineering Faculty, Plasma Aided Biomedical Research Group (pabmed), TOBB University of Economics and Technology, Ankara 06560, Turkey
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Abstract

Amine-based plasma polymer thin films (NH2-PPTFs) are favorable due to their potential ability for binding a variety of biomolecules, especially in biotechnologic studies. In this context, to understand the effect of different amine sources on quartz tuning forks’ (QTF) surface functionalization and isolation, we prepared PPTFs by single-step plasma polymerization process. The amino-group concentration of PPTF's was proportionally increased by increasing discharge powers, whereas not affected from exposure time. It was observed that the resistivity increased with the increasing molecular weight of the precursor. In conclusion, NH2-PPTF-modified QTFs present as a great candidate for future biotechnologic applications.

Type
Research Letters
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2018 

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