Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-888d5979f-jgqf9 Total loading time: 1.456 Render date: 2021-10-26T21:50:22.794Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Signal detection limit of a portable Raman spectrometer for the SERS detection of gunshot residue

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 August 2019

Evan Thayer
Affiliation:
Department of Chemistry, Towson University, 8000 York Road, Towson, MD 21252, USA
Wilson Turner
Affiliation:
Department of Chemistry, Towson University, 8000 York Road, Towson, MD 21252, USA
Stephen Blama
Affiliation:
Department of Chemistry, Towson University, 8000 York Road, Towson, MD 21252, USA
Mary Sajini Devadas*
Affiliation:
Department of Chemistry, Towson University, 8000 York Road, Towson, MD 21252, USA
Ellen M. Hondrogiannis*
Affiliation:
Department of Chemistry, Towson University, 8000 York Road, Towson, MD 21252, USA
*
Address all correspondence to Ellen M. Hondrogiannis at ehondrogiannis@towson.edu; Mary Sajini Devadas at mdevadas@towson.edu
Address all correspondence to Ellen M. Hondrogiannis at ehondrogiannis@towson.edu; Mary Sajini Devadas at mdevadas@towson.edu
Get access

Abstract

Signal detection limit (SDL), limit of detection (LOD), and limit of quantitation of a portable Raman spectrometer were measured for smokeless gunpowder stabilizers, diphenylamine (DPA) and ethyl centralite (EC), in acetone, acetonitrile, ethanol, and methanol. Acetone yielded the lowest LOD for three of four DPA peaks, and acetonitrile yielded the lowest LOD for two of three EC peaks and the remaining DPA peak. When gold nanoparticles were added to the DPA solutions in acetone and acetonitrile, statistically significant changes were observed (DPA peak position, full width at half maximum, and/or total area) and SDL was improved for the majority of all peaks in both solvents.

Type
Research Letters
Copyright
Copyright © The Author(s) 2019 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

1.N.R. Council: Black and Smokeless Powders: Technologies for Finding Bombs and the Bomb Makers (The National Academies Press, Washington, DC, USA, 1998).Google Scholar
2.ASTM: ASTM E1588-10, Standard Guide for Gunshot Residue Analysis by Scanning Electron Microscopy/Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectrometry (ASTM International, West Conshohocken, PA, USA 2010).Google Scholar
3.Maitre, M., Kirkbride, K.P., Horder, M., Roux, C., and Beavis, A.: Current perspectives in the interpretation of gunshot residues in forensic science: a review. Forensic Sci. Int. 270, 1 (2017).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
4.Taudte, R.V., Beavis, A., Blanes, L., Cole, N., Doble, P., and Roux, C.: Detection of gunshot residues using mass spectrometry. Biomed. Res. Int. 2014, 16 (2014).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
5.Doty, K.C. and Lednev, I.K.: Raman spectroscopy for forensic purposes: recent applications for serology and gunshot residue analysis. TrAC Trends Anal. Chem. 103, 215 (2018).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
6.Suzuki, E.M. and Buzzini, P.: Applications of Raman spectroscopy in forensic science. II: analysis considerations, spectral interpretation, and examination of evidence. Forensic Sci. Rev. 30, 137 (2018).Google Scholar
7.Brożek-Mucha, Z.: Trends in analysis of gunshot residue for forensic purposes. Anal. Bioanal. Chem. 409, 5803 (2017).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
8.Haynes, C.L., McFarland, A.D., and Van Duyne, R.P.: Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. Anal. Chem. 77, 338A (2005).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
9.Lopez-Lopez, M., Merk, V., Garcia-Ruiz, C., and Kneipp, J.: Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy for the analysis of smokeless gunpowders and macroscopic gunshot residues. Anal. Bioanal. Chem. 408, 4965 (2016).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
10.Izake, E.L.: Forensic and homeland security applications of modern portable Raman spectroscopy. Forensic Sci. Int. 202, 1 (2010).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
11.Liszewska, M., Bartosewicz, B., Budner, B., Nasiłowska, B., Szala, M., Weyher, J., Dzięcielewski, I., Mierczyk, Z., and Jankiewicz, B.: Evaluation of selected SERS substrates for trace detection of explosive materials using portable Raman systems. Vib. Spectrosc. 100, 79 (2019).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
12.Kondo, T., Hashimoto, R., Ohrui, Y., Sekioka, R., Nogami, T., Muta, F., and Seto, Y.: Analysis of chemical warfare agents by portable Raman spectrometer with both 785 nm and 1064 nm excitation. Forensic Sci. Int. 291, 23 (2018).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
13.Hager, E., Farber, C., and Kurouski, D.: Forensic identification of urine on cotton and polyester fabric with a hand-held Raman spectrometer. Forensic Chem. 9, 44 (2018).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
14.Wiktelius, D., Ahlinder, L., Larsson, A., Höjer Holmgren, K., Norlin, R., and Andersson, P.O.: On the use of spectra from portable Raman and ATR-IR instruments in synthesis route attribution of a chemical warfare agent by multivariate modeling. Talanta 186, 622 (2018).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
15.Harvey, S.D., Peters, T.J., and Wright, B.W.: Safety considerations for sample analysis using a near-infrared (785 nm) Raman laser source. Appl. Spectrosc. 57, 580 (2003).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
16.McNesby, K.L., Wolfe, J.E., Morris, J.B., and Pesce-Rodriguez, R.A.: Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy of some energetic materials and propellant formulations. J. Raman Spectrosc. 25, 75 (1994).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
17.Sett, P., De, A.K., Chattopadhyay, S., and Mallick, P.K.: Raman excitation profile of diphenylamine. Chem. Phys. 276, 211 (2002).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
18.Zeng, J., Qi, J., Bai, F., Chung Yu, J.C., and Shih, W.-C.: Analysis of ethyl and methyl centralite vibrational spectra for mapping organic gunshot residues. Analyst 139, 4270 (2014).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
19.López-López, M., Merk, V., García-Ruiz, C., and Kneipp, J.: Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy for the analysis of smokeless gunpowders and macroscopic gunshot residues. Anal. Bioanal. Chem. 408, 4965 (2016).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
20.Kim, W., Lee, S.H., Kim, J.H., Ahn, Y.J., Kim, Y.-H., Yu, J.S., and Choi, S.: Paper-based surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy for diagnosing prenatal diseases in women. ACS Nano 12, 7100 (2018).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
21.Matricardi, C., Hanske, C., Garcia-Pomar, J.L., Langer, J., Mihi, A., and Liz-Marzán, L.M.: Gold nanoparticle plasmonic superlattices as surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy substrates. ACS Nano 12, 8531 (2018).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
22.Foti, A., D'Andrea, C., Villari, V., Micali, N., Donato, M.G., Fazio, B., Maragò, O.M., Gillibert, R., Lamy de la Chapelle, M., and Gucciardi, P.G.: Optical aggregation of gold nanoparticles for SERS detection of proteins and toxins in liquid environment: towards ultrasensitive and selective detection. Materials 11, 440 (2018).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
23.Navin, C.V., Tondepu, C., Toth, R., Lawson, L.S., and Rodriguez, J.D.: Quantitative determinations using portable Raman spectroscopy. J. Pharm. Biomed. Anal. 136, 156 (2017).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
24.Muehlethaler, C., Leona, M., and Lombardi, J.R.: Towards a validation of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for use in forensic science: repeatability and reproducibility experiments. Forensic Sci. Int. 268, 1 (2016).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
25.Tian, F., Bonnier, F., Casey, A., Shanahan, A.E., and Byrne, H.J.: Surface enhanced Raman scattering with gold nanoparticles: effect of particle shape. Anal. Methods 6, 9116 (2014).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Supplementary material: PDF

Thayer et al. supplementary material

Figures S1-S8

Download Thayer et al. supplementary material(PDF)
PDF 542 KB
Supplementary material: PDF

Thayer et al. supplementary material

Tables S1-S6

Download Thayer et al. supplementary material(PDF)
PDF 103 KB

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Signal detection limit of a portable Raman spectrometer for the SERS detection of gunshot residue
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Signal detection limit of a portable Raman spectrometer for the SERS detection of gunshot residue
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Signal detection limit of a portable Raman spectrometer for the SERS detection of gunshot residue
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *