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Organic electrochemical transistors as impedance biosensors

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 December 2014

Gregório C. Faria
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305; São Carlos Physics Institute, University of São Paulo, PO Box: 369, 13560-970 São Carlos, SP, Brazil
Duc T. Duong
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305
Alberto Salleo*
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305
Christos A. Polyzoidis
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, Lab of “Thin Films- Nanosystems & Nanometrology (LFTN), Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki, Greece
Stergios Logothetidis
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, Lab of “Thin Films- Nanosystems & Nanometrology (LFTN), Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki, Greece
Jonathan Rivnay
Affiliation:
Department of Bioelectronics, École Nationale Supérieure des Mines, CMP-EMSE, MOC, 13541 Gardanne, France
Roisin Owens
Affiliation:
Department of Bioelectronics, École Nationale Supérieure des Mines, CMP-EMSE, MOC, 13541 Gardanne, France
George G. Malliaras
Affiliation:
Department of Bioelectronics, École Nationale Supérieure des Mines, CMP-EMSE, MOC, 13541 Gardanne, France
*
Address all correspondence to Alberto Salleo at asalleo@stanford.edu
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Abstract

Interfacing organic electrochemical transistors (OECTs) with biological systems holds considerable promise for building-sensitive biosensors and diagnostic tools. We present a simple model that describes the performance of biosensors in which an OECT is integrated with a biological barrier layer. Using experimentally derived parameters we explore the limits of sensitivity and find that it is dependent on the resistance of the barrier layer. This work provides guidelines on how to optimize biosensors in which OECTs transduce changes in the impedance of biological layers, including lipid bilayer membranes and confluent cell layers.

Type
Research Letters
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2014 

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