Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-568f69f84b-l2zqg Total loading time: 0.282 Render date: 2021-09-20T18:44:31.465Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Graphene oxide film as a template for the creation of three-dimensional lamellar metal oxides and reduced graphene oxide/metal oxide hybrids

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  19 November 2014

Xiguang Gao
Affiliation:
Department of Chemistry & Waterloo Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1, Canada
Mahyar Mazloumi
Affiliation:
Department of Chemistry & Waterloo Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1, Canada
Louis Cheung
Affiliation:
Department of Chemistry & Waterloo Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1, Canada
Xiaowu (Shirley) Tang*
Affiliation:
Department of Chemistry & Waterloo Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue West, Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1, Canada
*Corresponding
Address all correspondence to X. Tang at tangxw@uwaterloo.ca
Get access

Abstract

Here we report a general method for the synthesis of layered inorganic nanocrystalline materials using graphene oxide (GO) film as the template. Free-standing three-dimensional (3D) lamellar ZnO, α-Fe2O3, and reduced GO/ZnO hybrid structures were synthesized as examples. Such layered structures could also be exfoliated to obtain 2D assembled nanocrystal microsheets. The abundant nucleation sites on the GO surface and the compact stacking of GO platelets made it possible to tightly control metal oxide crystal size (~15 nm), alter preferential crystal growth direction, and assemble the nanocrystals into sheets, as confirmed by multiple characterization techniques.

Type
Research Letters
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2014 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below. (Log in options will check for institutional or personal access. Content may require purchase if you do not have access.)

References

1.Blanford, C.F., Yan, H.W., Schroden, R.C., Al-Daous, M. and Stein, A.: Gems of chemistry and physics: macroporous metal oxides with 3D order. Adv. Mater. 13, 401 (2001).3.0.CO;2-7>CrossRefGoogle Scholar
2.Moreau, J.J.E., Vellutini, L., Man, M.W.C., Bied, C., Bantignies, J.L., Dieudonné, P. and Sauvajol, J.L.: Self-organized hybrid silica with long-range ordered lamellar structure. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 123, 7957 (2001).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
3.Polshettiwar, V., Baruwati, B. and Varma, R.S.: Self-assembly of metal oxides into three-dimensional nanostructures: synthesis and application in catalysis. ACS Nano 3, 728 (2009).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
4.Shopsowitz, K.E., Stahl, A., Hamad, W.Y. and MacLachlan, M.J.: Hard templating of nanocrystalline titanium dioxide with chiral nematic ordering. Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. Engl. 51, 6886 (2012).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
5.Milliron, D.J., Buonsanti, R., Llordes, A. and Helms, B.A.: Constructing functional mesostructured materials from colloidal nanocrystal building blocks. Acc. Chem. Res. 47, 236 (2014).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
6.van Bommel, K.J.C., Friggeri, A. and Shinkai, S.: Organic templates for the generation of inorganic materials. Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. Engl. 42, 980 (2003).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
7.Lu, A.-H. and Schüth, F.: Nanocasting: a versatile strategy for creating nanostructured porous materials. Adv. Mater. 18, 1793 (2006).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
8.Cheng, F., Tao, Z., Liang, J. and Chen, J.: Template-directed materials for rechargable lithium-ion batteries. Chem. Mater. 20, 667 (2008).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
9.Jiao, F., Harrison, A., Jumas, J.-C., Chadwick, A.V., Kockelmann, W. and Bruce, P.G.: Ordered mesoporous Fe2O3 with crystalline walls. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 128, 5468 (2006).Google ScholarPubMed
10.Dikin, D.A., Stankovich, S., Zimney, E.J., Piner, R.D., Dommett, G.H.B., Evmenenko, G., Nguyen, S.T. and Ruoff, R.S.: Preparation and characterization of graphene oxide paper. Nature 448, 457 (2007).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
11.Dreyer, D.R., Park, S., Bielawski, C.W. and Ruoff, R.S.: The chemistry of graphene oxide. Chem. Soc. Rev. 39, 228 (2010).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
12.Gunjakar, J.L., Kim, T.W., Kim, H.N., Kim, I.Y. and Hwang, S.J.: Mesoporous layer-by-layer ordered nanohybrids of layered double hydroxide and layered metal oxide: highly active visible light photocatalysts with improved chemical stability. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 133, 14998 (2011).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
13.Shin, S.I., Go, A., Kim, I.Y., Lee, J.M., Lee, Y. and Hwang, S.J.: A beneficial role of exfoliated layered metal oxide nanosheets in optimizing the electrocatalytic activity and pore structure of Pt-reduced graphene oxide nanocomposites. Energy Environ. Sci. 6, 608 (2013).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
14.Liang, Y., Li, Y., Wang, H. and Dai, H.: Strongly coupled inorganic/nanocarbon hybrid materials for advanced electrocatalysis. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 135, 2013 (2013).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
15.Bruns, C.J., Herman, D.J., Minuzzo, J.B., Lehrman, J.A. and Stupp, S.I.: Rationalizing molecular design in the electrodeposition of anisotropic lamerllar nanostructures. Chem. Mater. 25, 4330 (2013).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
16.Hummers, W.S. and Offeman, R.E.: Preparation of graphitic oxide. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 80, 1339 (1958).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
17.Gao, X. and Tang, X.S.: Effective reduction of graphene oxide thin films by a fluorinating agent: diethylaminosulfur trifluoride. Carbon 76, 133 (2014).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
18.Stankovich, S., Dikin, D.A., Piner, R.D., Kohlhaas, K.A., Kleinhammes, A., Jia, Y., Wu, Y., Nguyen, S.T. and Ruoff, R.S.: Synthesis of graphene-based nanosheets via chemical reduction of exfoliated graphite oxide. Carbon 45, 1558 (2007).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
19.Mazloumi, M., Mandal, H.S. and Tang, X.S.: Fabrication of optical device arrays using patterned growth of ZnO nanostructures. IEEE Trans. Nanotechnol. 11, 444 (2012).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
20.Vayssieres, L., Keis, K., Lindquist, S.-E. and Hagfeldt, A.: Purpose-built anisotropic metal oxide material: 3D highly oriented microrod array of ZnO. J. Phys. Chem. B 105, 3350 (2001).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
21.Tseng, Y.K., Huang, C.J., Cheng, H.M., Lin, I.N., Liu, K.S. and Chen, I.C.: Characterization and field-emission properties of needle-like zinc oxide nanowires grown vertically on conductive zinc oxide films. Adv. Funct. Mater. 13, 811 (2003).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
22.Cullity, B.D.: Elements of X-Ray Diffraction, 2nd ed. (Addison-Wesley, Boston, MA, USA, 1978).Google Scholar
23.Cho, S., Jung, S.H. and Lee, K.H.: Morphology-controlled growth of ZnO nanostructures using microwave irradiation: from basic to complex structures. J. Phys. Chem. C 112, 12769 (2008).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
24.Mazloumi, M., Shadmehr, S., Rangom, Y., Nazar, L.F. and Tang, X.S.: Fabrication of three-dimensional carbon nanotube and metal oxide hybrid mesoporous architectures. ACS Nano 7, 4281 (2013).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
25.El-Kady, M.F., Strong, V., Dubin, S. and Kaner, R.B.: Laser scribing of high-performance and flexible graphene-based electrochemical capacitors. Science 335, 1326 (2012).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
26.Moon, I.K., Lee, J., Ruoff, R.S. and Lee, H.: Reduced graphene oxide by chemical graphitization. Nat. Commun. 1, 73 (2010).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
27.Chen, J., Xu, L., Li, W. and Gou, X.: Alpha-Fe2O3 nanotubes in gas sensor and lithium-ion battery applications. Adv. Mater. 17, 582 (2005).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
28.Lee, J., Orilall, M.C., Warren, S.C., Kamperman, M., DiSalvo, F.J. and Wiesner, U.: Direct access to thermally stable and highly crystalline mesoporous transition-metal oxides with uniform pores. Nat. Mater. 7, 222 (2008).CrossRefGoogle ScholarPubMed
29.Xia, Y. and Mokaya, R.: Hollow spheres of crystalline porous metal oxides: a generalized synthesis route via nanocasting with mesoporous carbon hollow shells. J. Mater. Chem. 15, 3126 (2005).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
30.Wang, Y., Lee, J.Y. and Zeng, H.C.: Polycrystalline SnO2 nanotubes prepared via infiltration casting of nanocrystallites and their electrochemical application. Chem. Mater. 17, 3899 (2005).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
31.Li, W.Y., Xu, L.N. and Chen, J.: Co3O4 nanomaterials in lithium-ion batteries and gas sensors. Adv. Funct. Mater. 2005, 15, 851.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
Supplementary material: File

Gao Supplementary Material

Supplementary Material

Download Gao Supplementary Material(File)
File 2 MB

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Graphene oxide film as a template for the creation of three-dimensional lamellar metal oxides and reduced graphene oxide/metal oxide hybrids
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Graphene oxide film as a template for the creation of three-dimensional lamellar metal oxides and reduced graphene oxide/metal oxide hybrids
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Graphene oxide film as a template for the creation of three-dimensional lamellar metal oxides and reduced graphene oxide/metal oxide hybrids
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *