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Additive manufacturing of metal matrix composites via nanofunctionalization

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  21 May 2018

John H. Martin*
Affiliation:
HRL Laboratories LLC, Malibu, California 90265-4797, USA
Brennan D. Yahata
Affiliation:
HRL Laboratories LLC, Malibu, California 90265-4797, USA
Eric C. Clough
Affiliation:
HRL Laboratories LLC, Malibu, California 90265-4797, USA
Justin A. Mayer
Affiliation:
HRL Laboratories LLC, Malibu, California 90265-4797, USA
Jacob M. Hundley
Affiliation:
HRL Laboratories LLC, Malibu, California 90265-4797, USA
Tobias A. Schaedler
Affiliation:
HRL Laboratories LLC, Malibu, California 90265-4797, USA
*
Address all correspondence to John H. Martin at JHMartin@hrl.com
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Abstract

A novel, alloy-agnostic, nanofunctionalization process has been utilized to produce metal matrix composites (MMCs) via additive manufacturing, providing new geometric freedom for MMC design. MMCs were produced with the addition of tungsten carbide nanoparticles to commercially available AlSi10Mg alloy powder. Tungsten carbide was chosen due to the potential for coherent crystallographic phases that were identified utilizing a lattice-matching approach to promote wetting and increase dislocation interactions. Structures were produced with evenly distributed strengthening phases leading to tensile strengths >385 MPa and a 50% decrease in wear rate over the commercially available AlSi10Mg alloy at only 1 vol% loading of tungsten carbide.

Type
Research Letters
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2018 

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