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Relationship Between Thermoelectric Properties and Morphology of Doped P3HT Thin Films for Potential Thermoelectric Applications

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  29 July 2019

Jonathan J. Montes
Affiliation:
Center for Materials Research, Norfolk State University, Norfolk, VA23504, USA Department of Chemistry, Norfolk State University, Norfolk, VA23504, USA
Harold O. Lee III*
Affiliation:
Center for Materials Research, Norfolk State University, Norfolk, VA23504, USA
Faniya C. Doswell
Affiliation:
Center for Materials Research, Norfolk State University, Norfolk, VA23504, USA Department of Chemistry, Norfolk State University, Norfolk, VA23504, USA
Sam-Shajing Sun
Affiliation:
Center for Materials Research, Norfolk State University, Norfolk, VA23504, USA PhD Program in Materials Science and Engineering, Norfolk State University, Norfolk, VA23504, USA Department of Chemistry, Norfolk State University, Norfolk, VA23504, USA
*Corresponding
*(Email: holee3@me.com)
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Abstract

Polymeric conjugated materials are very promising for developing future soft material-based semiconductors, conductors, electronic and optoelectronic devices due to their inherent advantages such as flexibility, low-cost, ease of processability, and decreased harmful waste. Like their inorganic counterparts, the addition of certain dopants can significantly alter the electronic and optoelectronic properties of the host conjugated polymers or composites allowing modification for a variety of electronic/optoelectronic applications. One way to improve device performance is through the process of thermal annealing. Annealing allows for polymer matrices to self-assemble into a lower energy state which typically leads to increased crystallinity and higher charge mobility. In this work, we plan to evaluate the effects of annealing on doped P3HT films to understand its effects on optoelectronic and electronic properties focusing solely on crystallinity and charge carriers. Further understanding of the connection between annealing and doping in polymeric conjugated materials and thermoelectric properties will allow for an increase net output from multi-function materials and devices.

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Copyright © Materials Research Society 2019 

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