Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-5cfd469876-2rqk5 Total loading time: 0.259 Render date: 2021-06-23T13:26:17.926Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true }

Article contents

Formation Mechanism of Conducting Path in Resistive Random Access Memory by First Principles Calculation Using Practical Model Based on Experimental Results

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  20 June 2016

Takumi Moriyama
Affiliation:
Department of Information and Electronics, Graduate School of Engineering, Tottori University, 4-101 Koyama-Minami, Tottori 680-8552, Japan. Tottori Integrated Frontier Research Center, 4-101 Koyama-Minami, Tottori 680-8552, Japan.
Takahiro Yamasaki
Affiliation:
Natonal Institute for Materials Science, Namiki 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044, Japan.
Takahisa Ohno
Affiliation:
Natonal Institute for Materials Science, Namiki 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044, Japan. Institute of Industrial Science, the University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8505, Japan.
Satoru Kishida
Affiliation:
Department of Information and Electronics, Graduate School of Engineering, Tottori University, 4-101 Koyama-Minami, Tottori 680-8552, Japan. Tottori Integrated Frontier Research Center, 4-101 Koyama-Minami, Tottori 680-8552, Japan.
Kentaro Kinoshita
Affiliation:
Department of Information and Electronics, Graduate School of Engineering, Tottori University, 4-101 Koyama-Minami, Tottori 680-8552, Japan. Tottori Integrated Frontier Research Center, 4-101 Koyama-Minami, Tottori 680-8552, Japan.
Corresponding
Get access

Abstract

For practical use of Resistive Random Access Memory (ReRAM), understanding resistive switching mechanism in transition metal oxides (TMO) is important. Some papers predict its mechanism by using first principles calculation; for example, TMO become conductive by introducing oxygen vacancy in bulk single crystalline TMO. However, most of ReRAM samples have polycrystalline structures. In this paper, we introduced a periodic slab model to depict grain boundary and calculated the surface energy and density of states for surfaces of NiO with various orientations using first-principles calculation to consider the effect of grain boundaries for resistive switching mechanisms of ReRAM. As a results, vacancies can be formed on the side surface of grain more easily than in grain. Moreover, we showed that surface conductivity depends on surface orientation of NiO and the orientation of side surface of grain can change easily by introduction of vacancies, which is the switching mechanism of NiO-ReRAM

Type
Articles
Copyright
Copyright © Materials Research Society 2016 

Access options

Get access to the full version of this content by using one of the access options below.

References

Gibbons, J. F. and Beadle, W. E., Solid-State Electronics 1964, 7, 785797.CrossRef
Choi, B. J., Jeong, D. S. and Kim, S. K., Journal of Applied Physics 2005, 98, 033715.CrossRef
Lee, H. Y., Chen, Y. S., Chen, P. S., Gu, P. Y., Hsu, Y. Y., Wang, S. M., Liu, W. H., Tsai, C. H., Sheu, S. S., Chiang, P. C., Lin, W. P., Lin, C. H., Chen, W. S., Chen, F. T., Lien, C. H., Tsai, M. J., Tech. Dig. Int. Electron Devices Meeting 2010, 436439.
Wei, Z., Takagi, T., Kanzawa, Y., Katoh, Y., Ninomiya, T., Kawai, K., Muraoka, S., Mitani, S., Katayama, K., Fujii, S., Miyanaga, R., Kawashima, Y., Mikawa, T., Shimakawa, K. and Aono, K., IEDM Tech. Dig. 2011, p. 31.4.1.
Lee, H. D., Magyari-Kope, B. and Nishi, Y., Phys. Rev. B 81, 193202 (2010).CrossRef
Perdew, J. P., Burke, K. and Ernzerhof, M., Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 3865 (1996).CrossRef
Noguchi, Y., Uchino, M., Hikosaka, H., Atou, T., Kusaba, K., Fukuoka, K., Mashimo, T. and Syono, Y., J. Phys. Chem. Solids 60, 509 (1999).CrossRef
Rohrbach, A., Hafner, J. and Kresse, G., Phys. Rev. B 69, 075413 (2004).CrossRef
Sawatzky, G. A. and Allen, J. W., Phys. Rev. Lett. 53, 2339 (1984).CrossRef

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Formation Mechanism of Conducting Path in Resistive Random Access Memory by First Principles Calculation Using Practical Model Based on Experimental Results
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Formation Mechanism of Conducting Path in Resistive Random Access Memory by First Principles Calculation Using Practical Model Based on Experimental Results
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Formation Mechanism of Conducting Path in Resistive Random Access Memory by First Principles Calculation Using Practical Model Based on Experimental Results
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *