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Nomenclature of Pyroxenes

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 July 2018

N. Morimoto
Affiliation:
Chairman, Department of Geology and Mineralogy, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606, Japan
J. Fabries
Affiliation:
France
A. K. Ferguson
Affiliation:
Australia
I. V. Ginzburg
Affiliation:
USSR
M. Ross
Affiliation:
USA
F. A. Seifert
Affiliation:
Germany
J. Zussman
Affiliation:
UK
K. Aoki
Affiliation:
Japan
G. Gottardi
Affiliation:
Italy

Abstract

This is the final report on the nomenclature of pyroxenes by the Subcommittee on Pyroxenes established by the Commission on New Minerals and Mineral Names of the International Mineralogical Association. The recommendations of the Subcommittee as put forward in this report have been formally accepted by the Commission. Accepted and widely used names have been chemically defined, by combining new and conventional methods, to agree as far as possible with the consensus of present use. Twenty names are formally accepted, among which thirteen are used to represent the end-members of definite chemical compositions. In common binary solid-solution series, species names are given to the two end-members by the ‘50% rule’. Adjectival modifiers for pyroxene mineral names are defined to indicate unusual amounts of chemical constituents. This report includes a list of 105 previously used pyroxene names that have been formally discarded by the Commission.

Type
Nomenclature Report
Copyright
Copyright © The Mineralogical Society of Great Britain and Ireland 1988

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Footnotes

Subcommittee on Pyroxenes, IMA

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