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The electrical conductivity of dry polycrystalline olivine compacts at high temperatures and pressures

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 July 2018

Lidong Dai
Affiliation:
Laboratory for Study of the Earth's Interior and Geofluids, Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guiyang, Guizhou 550002, China
Heping Li*
Affiliation:
Laboratory for Study of the Earth's Interior and Geofluids, Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guiyang, Guizhou 550002, China
Chunhai Li
Affiliation:
State Key Laboratory for Mineral Deposits Research, Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210093, China
Haiying Hu
Affiliation:
Laboratory for Study of the Earth's Interior and Geofluids, Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guiyang, Guizhou 550002, China Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039, China
Shuangming Shan
Affiliation:
Laboratory for Study of the Earth's Interior and Geofluids, Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guiyang, Guizhou 550002, China

Abstract

The electrical conductivity of dry polycrystalline olivine compacts (hot-pressed and sintered pellets) was measured at pressures of 1.0–4.0 GPa, at temperatures of 1073–1423 K, and at different oxygen fugacities via the use of a YJ-3000t multi-anvil press. Oxygen fugacity was controlled successfully by means of five solid buffers: Fe3O4-Fe2O3, Ni-NiO, Fe-Fe3O4, Fe-FeO and Mo-MoO2. Within the selected frequency range of 102–106 Hz, the experimental results indicate that the grain interior conduction mechanism is characterized by a semi-circular curve on an impedance diagram. As a function of increasing pressure, the electrical conductivity of polycrystalline olivine compacts decreases, whereas the activation enthalpy and the temperature-independent pre-exponential factors increase slightly. The activation energy and activation volume of polycrystalline olivine compacts were determined to be 141.02±2.53 kJ/mol and 0.25±0.05 cm3/mol, respectively. At a pressure of 4.0 GPa, electrical conductivity was observed to increase as a function of increasing oxygen fugacity, and the relationship between electrical conductivity and oxygen fugacity can be described as log10 (σ) = (2.47±0.085) + (0.096±0.023)×log10fO2 + (–0.55±0.011)/T, which presents the exponential factor q (˜0.096). Our observations demonstrate that the primary conduction mechanism for polycrystalline olivine compacts is a small polaron.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Mineralogical Society of Great Britain and Ireland 2010

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