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Dehydration processes in borate minerals: pentahydroborite and nifontovite from Fuka Mine, Okayama Prefecture, Japan

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 July 2018

V. Bermanec*
Affiliation:
Institute of Mineralogy and Petrology, Department of Geology, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, Horvatovac 95, 10000 Zagreb, Croatia
N. Tomašić
Affiliation:
Institute of Mineralogy and Petrology, Department of Geology, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, Horvatovac 95, 10000 Zagreb, Croatia
Ž. Žigovečki Gobac
Affiliation:
Institute of Mineralogy and Petrology, Department of Geology, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, Horvatovac 95, 10000 Zagreb, Croatia
M. Rajić Linarić
Affiliation:
Pliva, HR-10000 Zagreb, Croatia
K. Furić
Affiliation:
Molecular Physics Laboratory, Rudjer Bošković Institute, Bijenička cesta 54, POB 180, HR-10002 Zagreb, Croatia

Abstract

Data on the dehydration of pentahydroborite, CaB2O(OH)6·2H2O and nifontovite, Ca3B6O6(OH)12·2H2O from the Fuka mine, Japan are presented. Critical temperatures of the dehydration of the borates were determined by thermogravimetric analysis/differential thermal analysis measurements. The untreated mineral samples and their heating products were investigated by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. Upon dehydration, both minerals decompose and undergo amorphization, and at greater temperatures crystallize as an orthorhombic calcium borate, CaB2O4 (Pnca). The dehydration paths of the two minerals are different, with nifontovite showing a greater resistance to decomposition and amorphization than pentahydroborite. Differences in the dehydration processes are related to the residuals of the water content and structural accommodation of the borate polyanion.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Mineralogical Society of Great Britain and Ireland 2010

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Dehydration processes in borate minerals: pentahydroborite and nifontovite from Fuka Mine, Okayama Prefecture, Japan
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