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Celadonite-aluminous-glauconite: an example from the Lake District, UK

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  05 July 2018

P. J. Loveland
Affiliation:
Soil Survey of England and Wales, Rothamsted Experimental Station, Harpenden, Herts. AL5 2JQ
V. C. Bendelow
Affiliation:
Soil Survey of England and Wales, Rothamsted Experimental Station, Harpenden, Herts. AL5 2JQ

Abstract

An occurrence of a celadonite-like mineral in a weathered basalt in the Lake District has been investigated by X-ray diffraction, X-ray fluorescence, electron microprobe, and infra-red spectroscopic methods. The bulk composition of the mineral corresponds to an aluminous-glauconite. The data show that the mineral is most probably a celadonite-muscovite or celadonite-illite mixture, although a celadonite-phengite cannot be entirely discounted. Approximately 10% smectite layers are also present. The results suggest that re-examination of many aluminous glauconites may show them to be mixtures of this type.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © The Mineralogical Society of Great Britain and Ireland 1984

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