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Camanchacaite, chinchorroite, espadaite, magnesiofluckite, picaite and ríosecoite: six new hydrogen-arsenate minerals from the Torrecillas mine, Iquique Province, Chile

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  08 May 2019

Anthony R. Kampf*
Affiliation:
Mineral Sciences Department, Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County, 900 Exposition Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90007, USA
Barbara P. Nash
Affiliation:
Department of Geology and Geophysics, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah 84112, USA
Aaron J. Celestian
Affiliation:
Mineral Sciences Department, Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County, 900 Exposition Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA 90007, USA
Maurizio Dini
Affiliation:
Pasaje San Agustin 4045, La Serena, Chile
Arturo A. Molina Donoso
Affiliation:
Los Algarrobos 2986, Iquique, Chile
*
*Author for correspondence: Anthony R. Kampf, Email: akampf@nhm.org

Abstract

The new minerals camanchacaite, NaCaMg2[AsO4]2[AsO3(OH)2], chinchorroite, Na2Mg5(As2O7)2(AsO3OH)2(H2O)10, espadaite, Na4Ca3Mg2[AsO3(OH)]2[AsO2(OH)2]10(H2O)6·H2O, magnesiofluckite, CaMg(AsO3OH)2(H2O)2, picaite, NaCa[AsO3OH][AsO2(OH)2] and ríosecoite, Ca2Mg(AsO3OH)3(H2O)2, were discovered on two closely related specimens collected from the Torrecillas mine, Iquique Province, Chile. These minerals occur as secondary phases on massive quartz–hematite also in association with anhydrite, gypsum, halite and talmessite. Camanchacaite is monoclinic, C2/c, a = 12.470(9), b = 12.554(9), c = 6.848(9) Å, β = 113.75(2)°, V = 981.3(16) Å3 and Z = 4. It has a protonated alluaudite-type structure. Chinchorroite is triclinic, P$\bar{1}$, a = 8.7777(2), b = 8.8570(3), c = 9.7981(7) Å, α = 91.097(6), β = 110.544(8), γ = 103.167(7)°, V = 690.43(7) Å3 and Z = 1. The structure contains abbreviated chains of five edge-sharing Mg octahedra that are linked by pyroarsenate and hydrogen-arsenate groups. Espadaite is orthorhombic, Ccca, a = 12.3649(10), b = 22.181(2), c = 18.3292(13) Å, V = 5027.1(7) Å3 and Z = 4. The structure is based on heteropolyhedral sheets of formula {Ca3Mg2[AsO3(OH)]2[AsO2(OH)2]10}4− that contain large voids; NaO6 polyhedra occupy the interlayer region. Magnesiofluckite is triclinic, P$\bar{1}$, a = 8.4143(6), b = 7.5321(5), c = 6.8917(4) Å, α = 82.477(6), β = 97.682(6), γ = 95.379(6)°, V = 427.84(5) Å3 and Z = 2. It is isostructural with fluckite. Picaite is monoclinic, P21/c, a = 7.2474(4), b = 14.6547(7), c = 7.2624(5) Å, β = 99.520(7)°, V = 760.70(8) Å3 and Z = 4. The structure contains chains of edge-sharing Na− and Ca octahedra with bridging AsO3(OH) and AsO2(OH)2 tetrahedra. Ríosecoite is triclinic, P$\bar{1}$, a = 6.8110(9), b = 7.3156(12), c = 11.7773(17) Å, α = 83.466(6), β = 84.394(6), γ = 79.779(6)°, V = 571.95(15) Å3 and Z = 2. The structure contains tetramers of edge-sharing CaO7 and CaO8 polyhedra linked by MgO6 octahedra and bridging AsO3(OH) groups to form chains.

Type
Article
Copyright
Copyright © Mineralogical Society of Great Britain and Ireland 2019 

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Footnotes

Associate Editor: Irina O Galuskina

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Camanchacaite, chinchorroite, espadaite, magnesiofluckite, picaite and ríosecoite: six new hydrogen-arsenate minerals from the Torrecillas mine, Iquique Province, Chile
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Camanchacaite, chinchorroite, espadaite, magnesiofluckite, picaite and ríosecoite: six new hydrogen-arsenate minerals from the Torrecillas mine, Iquique Province, Chile
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