Skip to main content Accessibility help
×
Home
Hostname: page-component-568f69f84b-h2zp4 Total loading time: 0.191 Render date: 2021-09-20T01:19:24.290Z Has data issue: true Feature Flags: { "shouldUseShareProductTool": true, "shouldUseHypothesis": true, "isUnsiloEnabled": true, "metricsAbstractViews": false, "figures": true, "newCiteModal": false, "newCitedByModal": true, "newEcommerce": true, "newUsageEvents": true }

Article contents

Why Pressure Scales Cause So Much Confusion

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  14 March 2018

Anthony D. Buonaquisti*
Affiliation:
PO Box 2384, Chapel Hill NC, 27515 (919)967-0129
Rights & Permissions[Opens in a new window]

Extract

HTML view is not available for this content. However, as you have access to this content, a full PDF is available via the ‘Save PDF’ action button.

Pressure scales can be extremely confusing to new operators. This is not surprising. To my mind, there are three primary areas of confusion.

Firstly, the pressure of gas inside an instrument changes over many orders of magnitude during pumpdown. The change is about 9 orders of magnitude for a traditional Scanning Electron Microscope and about 13 orders of magnitude for an ultra-high vacuum instrument such as a Scanning Auger Microprobe.

To give an idea about the scale of change involved in vacuum, consider that the change in going from ambient pressure to that inside a typical ultra high vacuum system is like comparing one meter with the mean radius of the planet Pluto's orbit. The fact is that we don't often get to play with things on that scale. As a consequence, many of us have to keep reminding ourselves that 1 X 10-3 is one thousand times the value of 1 X 10-6 - not twice the value.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
Copyright © Microscopy Society of America 1993
You have Access

Send article to Kindle

To send this article to your Kindle, first ensure no-reply@cambridge.org is added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List under your Personal Document Settings on the Manage Your Content and Devices page of your Amazon account. Then enter the ‘name’ part of your Kindle email address below. Find out more about sending to your Kindle. Find out more about sending to your Kindle.

Note you can select to send to either the @free.kindle.com or @kindle.com variations. ‘@free.kindle.com’ emails are free but can only be sent to your device when it is connected to wi-fi. ‘@kindle.com’ emails can be delivered even when you are not connected to wi-fi, but note that service fees apply.

Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Why Pressure Scales Cause So Much Confusion
Available formats
×

Send article to Dropbox

To send this article to your Dropbox account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Dropbox.

Why Pressure Scales Cause So Much Confusion
Available formats
×

Send article to Google Drive

To send this article to your Google Drive account, please select one or more formats and confirm that you agree to abide by our usage policies. If this is the first time you use this feature, you will be asked to authorise Cambridge Core to connect with your <service> account. Find out more about sending content to Google Drive.

Why Pressure Scales Cause So Much Confusion
Available formats
×
×

Reply to: Submit a response

Please enter your response.

Your details

Please enter a valid email address.

Conflicting interests

Do you have any conflicting interests? *