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Helicobacter pylori Phage Screening

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  03 October 2008

Filipa F. Vale*
Affiliation:
Engineering Faculty, Porguguese Catholic University, Estrada Octávio Pato, 2635-631 Rio de Mouro, Portugal
António P.A. Matos
Affiliation:
Biomaterials Department, Dental Medical School, University of Lisbon and Curry Cabral Hospital, Lisbon, Portugal
Patrícia Carvalho
Affiliation:
Department of Materials Engineering, Technical University of Lisbon, 1049-001 Lisbon, Portugal
Jorge M.B. Vítor
Affiliation:
CECF (iMed), Pharmacy Faculty University of Lisgon, Av. Prof. Gama Pinto 1649-019 Lisboa, Portugal
*
Corresponding author. E-mail: filipavale@fe.ucp.pt
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Abstract

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Helicobacter pylori is a helical shaped Gram-negative bacterium that colonizes the human stomach. It is associated with several human pathologies, such as gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric cancer. The standard first-line treatment is a one week triple therapy: the association of two antibiotics, most frequently amoxicillin and clarithromycin, and a proton pump inhibior. Despite the evolution of the treatment strategy, quadruple therapy, there is an increasing percentage of failure of the antibiotic therapy, due to antibiotics resistance. Phage therapy is the therapeutic use of lytic bacteriophages to treat pathogenic bacterial infections and H. pylori is a good target. However there are no available phage collections, and H. pylori phages description is diminutive on literature.

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Copyright © Microscopy Society of America 2008
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