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Temperature Calibration for In Situ Environmental Transmission Electron Microscopy Experiments

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 October 2015

Jonathan P. Winterstein*
Affiliation:
FEI Company, 5350 NE Dawson Creek Drive, Hillsboro, Oregon 97124 USA NIST, 100 Bureau Dr., Gaithersburg, MD, USA
Pin Ann Lin
Affiliation:
NIST, 100 Bureau Dr., Gaithersburg, MD, USA Maryland NanoCenter, University of Maryland, 225 Paint Branch Dr, College Park, MD 20740
Renu Sharma
Affiliation:
NIST, 100 Bureau Dr., Gaithersburg, MD, USA
*
* Corresponding author. jonathan.winterstein@nist.gov

Abstract

In situ environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM) experiments require specimen heating holders to study material behavior in gaseous environments at elevated temperatures. In order to extract meaningful kinetic parameters, such as activation energies, it is essential to have a direct and accurate measurement of local sample temperature. This is particularly important if the sample temperature might fluctuate, for example when room temperature gases are introduced to the sample area. Using selected-area diffraction (SAD) in an ETEM, the lattice parameter of Ag nanoparticles was measured as a function of the temperature and pressure of hydrogen gas to provide a calibration of the local sample temperature. SAD permits measurement of temperature to an accuracy of ±30°C using Ag lattice expansion. Gas introduction can cause sample cooling of several hundred degrees celsius for gas pressures achievable in the ETEM.

Type
Equipment and Techniques Development
Copyright
© Microscopy Society of America 2015 

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