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Non-Invasive Imaging Technologies in Drug Safety Evaluation: Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Rats to Assess Theophyline-Induced Testes Toxicity

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  02 July 2020

M.W. Tengowski
Affiliation:
Drug Safety Evaluation, Pfizer Global Research & Development, Groton, Ct , 06340
L.W. Hedlund
Affiliation:
Center For, in Vivo Microscopy, Duke University, Durham, NC , 27710
D.J. Guyot
Affiliation:
Drug Safety Evaluation, Pfizer Global Research & Development, Groton, Ct , 06340
J.E. Burkhardt
Affiliation:
Drug Safety Evaluation, Pfizer Global Research & Development, Groton, Ct , 06340
G.A. Johnson
Affiliation:
Center For, in Vivo Microscopy, Duke University, Durham, NC , 27710

Abstract

Non-invasive imaging technologies such as magnetic resonance imaging are commonly used in clinical practice. in an experimental setting, it is possible to decrease field of view and pixel size, thereby increase image resolution. We tested this magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM) technique in a theopln lline-induced rat model of reproductive toxicity. The goal of this work was to study the sensitivity of MRM to detect or predict changes in tissue proton (i.e. water) characteristics, and confirm those findings with histology.

Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed either a control or theophylline (1.3-dimethylxanthine. 8000 ppm) diet. Experimental groups of days 8. 16. 24. and 32 animals were imaged with MRM (Figure 1) and tissue morphology confirmed with histology (Figure 2).

Tl-weighted images (with and without gadolinium-DTPA contrast. Magnevist®) and T2-weighted images were acquired at 2 T (spin-echo multislice images. 100 μm2 pixel. 300 μm slice thickness).

Type
Microscopy, Microanalysis and Imaging in the Pharmaceutical Industry (Organized by S. Samuelsson and B. Maleeff)
Copyright
Copyright © Microscopy Society of America 2001

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Non-Invasive Imaging Technologies in Drug Safety Evaluation: Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Rats to Assess Theophyline-Induced Testes Toxicity
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