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Identification of Objective Morphometric Markers of Xerostomia in the Oral Mucosa Epithelium with In Vivo Confocal Microscopy

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  06 February 2017

Ida G. Fostad*
Affiliation:
Department of Oral Biology, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Oslo, Sognsvannsveien 10, PO Box 1052, 0316 Oslo, Norway The Norwegian Dry Eye Clinic, Lille Grensen 7, 0159 Oslo, Norway
Jon R. Eidet
Affiliation:
The Norwegian Dry Eye Clinic, Lille Grensen 7, 0159 Oslo, Norway Department of Ophthalmology, Oslo University Hospital, Kirkeveien 166, PO Box 4956, Nydalen, Norway
Neil S. Lagali
Affiliation:
Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping, Sweden
Darlene A. Dartt
Affiliation:
Schepens Eye Research Institute/Massachusetts Eye and Ear, Harvard Medical School, 20 Staniford Street, Boston, MA 02114, USA
Sten Ræder
Affiliation:
The Norwegian Dry Eye Clinic, Lille Grensen 7, 0159 Oslo, Norway
Edvard B. Messelt
Affiliation:
Department of Oral Biology, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Oslo, Sognsvannsveien 10, PO Box 1052, 0316 Oslo, Norway
Tor P. Utheim
Affiliation:
Department of Oral Biology, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Oslo, Sognsvannsveien 10, PO Box 1052, 0316 Oslo, Norway The Norwegian Dry Eye Clinic, Lille Grensen 7, 0159 Oslo, Norway Department of Medical Biochemistry, Oslo University Hospital, Kirkeveien 166, PO Box 4956, Nydalen, Norway Department of Ophthalmology, Vestre Viken Hospital Trust, Dronninggata 28, 3004 Drammen, Norway
*Corresponding
* Corresponding author. ida_fostad@hotmail.com

Abstract

The purpose of this work was to determine whether the morphology of the oral mucosa epithelium (OME) of patients with xerostomia differ from patients without xerostomia. In total, 34 patients with dry eye disease (DED) with or without xerostomia were examined at The Norwegian Dry Eye Disease Clinic with in vivo confocal microscopy of the lower lip. In addition, age- and gender-matched healthy controls (HC) were included. DED patients with xerostomia had a higher superficial to deep backscatter ratio compared with DED patients without xerostomia (p=0.002) and HC (p=0.001). Regression analysis demonstrated that this ratio was related to xerostomia independently of gender and age (p<0.001). Sensitivity and specificity of detecting xerostomia were 0.78 and 0.85, respectively, when using a superficial to deep backscatter ratio cut-off value of 0.995 (p=0.004). The mean nucleus to cytosol backscatter ratio in the superficial OME was lower in patients with xerostomia than in those without xerostomia (p=0.034). In vivo confocal microscopy is a potential tool for evaluating the oral cavity and to assess changes in the OME associated with xerostomia, objectively and quantitatively. The cause of the increased backscatter in the superficial OME in xerostomia, however, remains to be elucidated.

Type
Biological Applications
Copyright
© Microscopy Society of America 2017 

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Identification of Objective Morphometric Markers of Xerostomia in the Oral Mucosa Epithelium with In Vivo Confocal Microscopy
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