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Gravitational-Like Lens Based on Graphene Ripple

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  26 August 2015

Daqing Liu*
Affiliation:
School of Mathematics and Physics, Changzhou University, Changzhou 213164, China School of Science, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049, China
Shuyue Chen
Affiliation:
School of Mathematics and Physics, Changzhou University, Changzhou 213164, China
Ning Ma
Affiliation:
Department of Physics, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024, China School of Science, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049, China
Xiang Zhao
Affiliation:
School of Science, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049, China
Zhuo Xu
Affiliation:
Electronic Materials Research Laboratory, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xi’an 710049, China
*
*Corresponding author.liudq@cczu.edu.cn

Abstract

We conducted a semiclassical study on carrier movement in curved graphene. A previous attempt was made to show that curved graphene is a readily available and cheap laboratory material used to study general relativity effects, especially if the electron energies satisfy ${\rm 4}\:\mu {\rm eV}\,\ll\,\left| E \right|\,\ll\,{\rm 3}\:{\rm eV}$ . Furthermore, a gravitational-like lens can be constructed based on a special graphene ripple; this lens has neither chromatic nor cometic aberration. One can design an ideal electron lens using a graphene ripple.

Type
Equipment and Software Development
Copyright
© Microscopy Society of America 2015 

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