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First Data from a Commercial Local Electrode Atom Probe (LEAP)

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  01 June 2004

Thomas F. Kelly
Affiliation:
Imago Scientific Instruments Corporation, 6300 Enterprise Lane, Madison, WI 53719-1193, USA
Tye T. Gribb
Affiliation:
Imago Scientific Instruments Corporation, 6300 Enterprise Lane, Madison, WI 53719-1193, USA
Jesse D. Olson
Affiliation:
Imago Scientific Instruments Corporation, 6300 Enterprise Lane, Madison, WI 53719-1193, USA
Richard L. Martens
Affiliation:
Imago Scientific Instruments Corporation, 6300 Enterprise Lane, Madison, WI 53719-1193, USA
Jeffrey D. Shepard
Affiliation:
Imago Scientific Instruments Corporation, 6300 Enterprise Lane, Madison, WI 53719-1193, USA
Scott A. Wiener
Affiliation:
Imago Scientific Instruments Corporation, 6300 Enterprise Lane, Madison, WI 53719-1193, USA
Thomas C. Kunicki
Affiliation:
Imago Scientific Instruments Corporation, 6300 Enterprise Lane, Madison, WI 53719-1193, USA
Robert M. Ulfig
Affiliation:
Imago Scientific Instruments Corporation, 6300 Enterprise Lane, Madison, WI 53719-1193, USA
Daniel R. Lenz
Affiliation:
Imago Scientific Instruments Corporation, 6300 Enterprise Lane, Madison, WI 53719-1193, USA
Eric M. Strennen
Affiliation:
Imago Scientific Instruments Corporation, 6300 Enterprise Lane, Madison, WI 53719-1193, USA
Edward Oltman
Affiliation:
Imago Scientific Instruments Corporation, 6300 Enterprise Lane, Madison, WI 53719-1193, USA
Joseph H. Bunton
Affiliation:
Imago Scientific Instruments Corporation, 6300 Enterprise Lane, Madison, WI 53719-1193, USA
David R. Strait
Affiliation:
Imago Scientific Instruments Corporation, 6300 Enterprise Lane, Madison, WI 53719-1193, USA

Abstract

The first dedicated local electrode atom probes (LEAP [a trademark of Imago Scientific Instruments Corporation]) have been built and tested as commercial prototypes. Several key performance parameters have been markedly improved relative to conventional three-dimensional atom probe (3DAP) designs. The Imago LEAP can operate at a sustained data collection rate of 1 million atoms/minute. This is some 600 times faster than the next fastest atom probe and large images can be collected in less than 1 h that otherwise would take many days. The field of view of the Imago LEAP is about 40 times larger than conventional 3DAPs. This makes it possible to analyze regions that are about 100 nm diameter by 100 nm deep containing on the order of 50 to 100 million atoms with this instrument. Several example applications that illustrate the advantages of the LEAP for materials analysis are presented.

Type
Research Article
Copyright
© 2004 Microscopy Society of America

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References

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First Data from a Commercial Local Electrode Atom Probe (LEAP)
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