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Characterization of an Inorganic Cryptomelane Nanomaterial Synthesized by a Novel Process Using Transmission Electron Microscopy and X-Ray Diffraction

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  04 July 2008

Longzhou Ma*
Affiliation:
Harry Reid Center for Environmental Studies, University of Nevada Las Vegas, 4505 Maryland Parkway, Las Vegas, NV 89154, USA
Thomas Hartmann
Affiliation:
Harry Reid Center for Environmental Studies, University of Nevada Las Vegas, 4505 Maryland Parkway, Las Vegas, NV 89154, USA Institute of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Idaho State University, Idaho Falls, ID 83402, USA
Marcos A. Cheney
Affiliation:
Department of Health Physics, University of Nevada Las Vegas, 4505 Maryland Parkway, Las Vegas, NV 89154, USA Department of Chemistry, University of Nevada Las Vegas, 4505 Maryland Parkway, Las Vegas, NV 89154, USA
Nancy R. Birkner
Affiliation:
Department of Chemistry, University of Nevada Las Vegas, 4505 Maryland Parkway, Las Vegas, NV 89154, USA
Pradip K. Bhowmik
Affiliation:
Department of Chemistry, University of Nevada Las Vegas, 4505 Maryland Parkway, Las Vegas, NV 89154, USA
*
Corresponding author. E-mail: lma@unlv.nevada.edu
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Abstract

Layer- and tunnel-structured manganese oxide nanomaterials are important because of their potential applications in industrial catalysis. A novel soft chemistry method was developed for the synthesis of inorganic cryptomelane nanomaterials with high surface area. Bright field transmission electron microscopy (BF-TEM) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) techniques were employed to characterize this nanomaterial. A nanosized material with fibrous texture comprised of 140–160 nm striations was identified by BF-TEM imaging. HRTEM images show multiple atomic morphologies such as “helix-type,” “doughnut-like,” and tunnel structures lying on different crystallographic planes. The crystallographic parameters of this material were analyzed and measured by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) showing that the synthesized nanomaterial is single phased and corresponds to cryptomelane with major diffraction peaks (for 10° < 2θ < 60°) at d-spacing values of 6.99, 4.94, 3.13, 2.40, 2.16, 1.84, 1.65, and 1.54 Å. A “doughnut-like” crystal structure was confirmed based on the crystallographic data. Structure and lattice parameters refinement was performed by XRD/Rietveld analysis. Simple simulation of HRTEM images and selected area diffraction patterns were applied to interpret the HRTEM images as observed.

Type
Materials Applications
Copyright
Copyright © Microscopy Society of America 2008

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References

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