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What the Fox Says, How the Fox Works: Deep Contextualization as a Source of New Research Agendas and Theoretical Insights

Published online by Cambridge University Press:  25 June 2015

Klaus E. Meyer
Affiliation:
China Europe International Business School, China
Corresponding
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Abstract

Using Isaiah Berlin’s distinction between foxes and hedgehogs, John Child’s approach to management research has been described as a fox in a community dominated by hedgehogs. I thus explore Child’s approach to conducting research on China-related phenomena, and place his new work into this trajectory. In doing so, I offer insights into the opportunities and limitations of developing research agendas and generating new theoretical insights from research that is deeply contextualized.

摘要

摘要

运用Berlin对狐狸和刺猬的区分,John Child的管理研究方法一直被描述为被刺猬主导的社区中的一只狐狸。因此,我挖掘Child用于开展中国现象研究的方法,并将他最新的研究纳入这条轨迹。由此,我为发展高度情境化的研究议程和产生新的理论洞察的机会和局限提出了见解。

Type
Forum Commentaries
Copyright
Copyright © International Association for Chinese Management Research 2014

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